The Bavarian Report on Scientology

From: "Remo Williams"
Newsgroups: de.soc.weltanschauung.scientology
Subject: Halbjahresbericht 2000 des Bayerischen Landesamt für Verfassungsschutz
Date: 2 Mar 2001

5. Scientology Organization (SO)

As has been determined at the Federal and State Interior Minister Conference of 5/6 June of 1997, actual indications for anti-constitutional endeavors by the SO are present. Therefore the mission of surveillance was opened. The foundation of the decision by the Interior Ministers Conference was the final report from a task force composed of Constitutional Security state and federal representatives who determined that legal provisions for surveillance of the SO were present. In this final report the evidence for the incompatibility of the SO's program and actions with the concepts of a liberal democratic basic system in the sense of the Constitution was presented in detail.

A report on the first surveillance results was presented at the 1998 Fall session of the Interior Ministers Conference. This report is available over the internet at address http://www.verfassungsschutz.nrw.de.

5.1 Unaltered Ideology

The SO's ideology is essentially based on L. Ron Hubbard's writings, which the group says possess unaltered validity. Older program statements by Hubbard, which include so-called "Policy Letters," continue to be presented to their staff as a mandatory orientation. An alteration of the ideological intention is not perceptible, instead the SO continues to distribute writings in the sense named. The SO also continued its efforts in the first half of 2000 to present itself as an allegedly persecuted minority religion. For that purpose numerous gatherings and campaigns were conducted.

5.2 Campaign against Surveillance by Constitutional Security

As previously done, the SO disparaged, insulted and libeled representatives of the Federal Republic of Germany as well as the German constitutional system itself in order to suggest persecution of the SO by the state to the public. Germany was described as a corrupt police state which systematically suppressed the practice of religion. As it has done in the past, the SO published reports worldwide about alleged discrimination against Scientologists in Germany which make comparisons to the persecution of the Jews in the Third Reich. In doing so an attempt is being made to put the federal government under pressure.

This purpose was also served in articles printed in the SO "Freiheit" publication of March 2000. Therein the SO polemicized against their surveillance by Constitutional Security and impugned the Bavarian Interior Minister, his staff as well as the Office for the Protection of the Constitution in general with allegations of illegal practices and a "politic of anti-constitutional discrimination." The magazine was distributed nationwide in large quantities.

The traveling "What is Scientology?" Show

From 22 to 29 March the SO put on a "What is Scientology?" show for recruitment purposes in a hotel in Munich. The operation was part of a Europe-wide roaming exhibition which was also held in seven German cities. The show was organized in Munich by the "Department of Special Affairs" (DSA). That group operates as the German sub-organization of Scientology's intelligence service, the "Office of Special Affairs" (OSA), headquartered in the USA and which is active in all countries through SO establishments.

In order to attract visitors, Scientologists distributed flyers, flowers and balloons to pedestrians in the area of Bayer Street and the Bahnhof square. Once the shows started ten Scientologists were constantly present for visitors to consult with in the exhibition spaces. Books, magazines and miscellaneous informational material were laid out for people to look at there. In contrast to the friendly atmosphere which the exhibition was meant to inspire externally, visitors reported being closely "escorted" by people acting as monitors inside. On the opening day the "Jive Aces" swing band advertised in the Bahnhof building for the show which, for the most part, was visited by young people. Nevertheless the SO did not attain its goal of inspiring wide interest for its purposes and of winning numerous new members. The number of visitors was significantly under 2,000.

5.4 Gathering of the International Association of Scientologist (IAS)

In anticipation of the "What is Scientology?" show, a two-day seminar called "Crusade for Total Freedom" took place on 17/18 March in a Munich auditorium exclusively for Scientologists by invitation only; it was to prepare the 400 to 500 members present for the exhibition. Main speaker was Andrik Shapers, an internationally renowned IAS activist.

In his talk Shapers included the political situation in Germany and Scientology's political objectives. He accused the former "Kohl administration" of being responsible for the SO being persecuted in Germany in the same manner and style as the Jews were in the National Socialist regime during the Third Reich. He said for that reason the SO recognized neither the current corrupt system nor the form of government. Shapers emphasized that they - the Scientologists - intended to spread Scientology all over the world and would continue to make this clear to the entire world. He said that Scientologists fought for a world liberated from suppression and corruption. He said they would continue to maintain their objective of clearing the planet. Shapers was tumultuously welcomed by the visitors to the gathering. The public expressed enthusiasm and euphoria.

Shapers' statements prove that the SO is continuing to make a claim to world domination, as formulated in the writings of Hubbard and the SO.

5.5 PR Event

For purposes of membership recruitment there was also an exhibition entitled "The Life and Work of L. Ron Hubbard - an Author for the People" from 20 June to 10 July in Munich. The organizers were the "L. Ron Hubbard Public Relations Office" and the "New Era Publications." Documents and photos were supposed to inform the visitors about the life of the SO Founder and bring his teachings closer to them. The event barely received any feedback from the public.

5.6 Further Activities

In the first half of 2000 15 miscellaneous activities in the name of the Scientology Organization were reported by the county administration department of the state capitol of Munich. Of those eleven were on the part of the SO cover organization "Kommission für Verstöße der Psychiatrie gegen Menschenrechte e.V." (KVPM); the rest were conducted by the "Scientology-Kirche Deutschland e.V." These action were organized under the following slogans:

The number of people participating in the uneventful gatherings was between three and 20 visitors. Only one event on the 23rd of April could interest 150 people for a short time in the appearance of a children's ballet ("Children of Freedom").

In the beginning of May there were isolated distribution actions of the "Freiheit" magazine of March 2000. Further the KVPM ("Commission for Violations of Psychiatry against Human Rights, Inc.") distributed numerous letters to Bavarian government agencies for the purpose of putting alleged violations by psychiatry on display. As a follow-up the same type of letter was sent out by members who stated in the letters that they were people harmed by psychiatry.

5.7 Matter of administrative dispute concerning the Bavarian street and right of way law

The decision by the Munich Administrative Court of 25 November 1999, which denied special use of public streets for what the SO calls "Body-routing," has in the meantime come into legal effect. Under the auspice of Body-routing SO staff had accosted pedestrians in Munich in the vicinity of 12 Beich Str., the actual operating offices of the Scientology Church Bavaria, Inc., and lured them into their spaces for a personality test. After "evaluation" of the test the subjects were shown their alleged personal deficiencies and offered the SO's "help" in alleviating them. The SO staff urged them to buy books and services in the form of courses. Their goal in doing that was to gain new members.

5.8 Activities in other countries

In France the government agency responsible for combatting so-called sects issued an evaluation about the SO to the French Prime Minister; it said the SO put human rights and social equality at risk, and misused the law and people's dignity. The report further found that the SO is an organization with a totalitarian structure which presented a hindrance to public order, that it is a secret alliance and that it continues to attempt to infiltrate democratic institutions and official international private organizations.

According to press reports disciplinary proceedings were undertaken against a woman judge who was accused of having removed important records in an extensive case against SO representatives. According to an article in a large German magazine a German Scientologist woman received asylum in the USA in 1997 based on wide scale fraudulent manipulation abetted by SO's intelligence service, the OSA. The asylum applicant had claimed "religious persecution" in Germany.

In Belgium, according to statements by criminal investigative authorities, there is an investigation underway against SO representatives concerning fraud, tax evasion, violations of data security and illicit practice of medicine.

5.9 SO membership status

The number of SO in Bavaria is unchanged from 1999 - about 2,600 members.

5.10 Confidential telephone line

The Bavarian State Office for the Protection of the Constitution maintains a confidential telephone line. Victims, former members and relatives of Scientology members may relay information about the SO there.

Remo Williams

These are quotes from Remo's sig file:


Praise for the "columns of security"

Beckstein holds fast with Constitutional Security /
Greens for "early retirement" /
Anniversary

Munich, Germany
June 8, 2000
Mittelbayerische Zeitung

Munich (lby). In the words of Interior Minister Guenther Beckstein (CSU), Bavaria will definitely support the work of Constitutional Security.

The agency had maintained the columns of internal security, Beckstein said yesterday in Munich at a celebration of the 50 years of existence of the State Office for Constitutional Security. He will therefore resist all attempts to diminish the importance of the state operating agency, to make cut-backs or even to put it in question in general.

From Beckstein's perspective, a special challenge is the struggle against rightwing extremism. He said everything must be done to stem the flow of rightwing extremist and anti-foreign acts of violence. At the same time he warned of an "upswing" of violence between left and right. "It is therefore also our mission, as politicians, to despise every form of violence as a means of political discussion."

Other important mission areas of the 400-man agency, according to Beckstein, are the observation of Islamic fundamentalists, the Scientology Organization and commercial espionage. The use of Constitutional Security to support police in the fight against organized crime has also been positively rated in other German states, he said.

The Greens again brought up discussion about doing away with Constitutional Security. The business of the State Office should be given over to revenue investigation, suggested Greens state chief Jerzy Montag. "50 years old is a good age for early retirement."


Bavaria wants to continue surveillance of Scientology

Munich, Germany
August 31, 1999
AFP

Munich/Hamburg (AFP) - The Bavarian state administration believes it is necessary for Constitutional Security to continue surveillance of Scientology. Interior State Secretary Hermann Regensburger (CSU) dismissed considerations of Nordrhein-Westphalian (NRW) Constitutional Security to suspend surveillance by the intelligence agency. Even if the number of active Scientologists were under 5,000, this was "no reason for calling off the alarm," stated Regensburger. He said that Scientology had at its disposal "a well-constructed, strategic network intact which was born by an aggressive cadre organization." Besides that, the suggestion of the Director of NRW Constitutional Security, Fritz Achim Baumann, was contrary to the report of the "Federal State Work Group on Scientology" of October 1998 as well as the report of the NRW Constitutional Security. Baumann said in an interview for the new edition of the Hamburg magazine, "Stern," that the danger from Scientology had been overestimated. In the two year surveillance of the organization, he stated that indications of endeavors against basic democratic order had indeed been found. These endeavors, "however, were not being transformed into reality, according to our observations." In contrast to Bavarian Interior Minister Guenther Beckstein (CSU), the NRW Constitutional Security agent saw no indications that Scientology had infiltrated the German economy to a great extent. The commercial potency of the Scientologists, he said, "had been strongly overestimated." The dangers associated with the organization were said to be less a concern for the state than they were for individuals. Therefore, he stated, sect counselors were more in demand than were secret agents.


Meeting with K.-D. Fritsche,
Constitutional Security agent

Munich Germany
July 5, 1999
Mittelbayerische Zeitung Politik

by our editorial staff member
Eva Witoschek

This Vice President of the Federal Office for Constitutional Security is no James Bond. Klaus-Dieter Fritsche has a full shock of hair, sits in a dark suit and gives the impression of reserve. However, as a political official and the second highest man in this federal office, Fritsche does not have to personally uncover spies, get the goods on traitors to the state or catch extremists at work himself. For that there are 2,200 staff in the interior and exterior branches of the Federal Office for Constitutional Security.

46-year old Fritsche is an attorney and has climbed up the career ladder step by step: first the native born resident of Bamberg was an administrative judge in Ansbach, then faction staff member of the CSU State Group in Bonn, representative in Bonn and then office director under Interior State Secretary Hermann Regensburger. Finally the father of five was called in October 1996 directly from the Office of the Bavarian Interior Minister, Guenther Beckstein, to serve in Constitutional Security.

Is it still generally necessary to have Constitutional Security in a united Europe? Fritsche answers firmly to the affirmative, "Constitutional Security has become even more suited to the times because in a world which is becoming more complex one can always count on new kinds of extremism. One example is Scientology. We are an early warning system." The mistake made in the Weimar Republic - to let enemies of democracy go about their business unbothered - should be avoided, said Fritsche.

Therefore Constitutional Security has been touring throughout the country for two and a half years with an itinerant exhibition "Democracy is violable - Rightwing Extremism in Germany", and so does justice to its mission of mental and political education. Presently the exhibition is presenting the dangers from rightwing extremism in Germany at the Evangelical education center at Regensburg.

Fritsche warned that the number of deeds of violence have decreased, but that the "rightwing personnel potential" has risen in the past year by eleven percent to 53,600 people. It is said to be particularly bad since the beginning of the 1990s in eastern Germany: 46% of all rightwing extremist acts of violence are said to have been committed there.

Nationwide, said Constitutional Security agent Fritsche concernedly, the number of disputes between rightwing and leftwing extremists has risen. The number of militant attack by leftwing upon rightwing has doubled in the past two years. The number of acts of violence on the left are higher than those of the rightwing. The left are a big problem mainly in the area of nuclear energy, admitted Fritsche. Nobody knows whether the RAF [Red Army Faction] might sometime rise again.

Does rightwing extremist terrorism exist? Is there a "Brown Army Faction"? "I would like to make it clear," said Fritsche, "at this time in Germany there is no organization which systematically commits serious violent acts to implement its goals." However rightwing extremists do possess weapons, and guidelines to terrorist actions are in circulation. There was concern about the explosives attack on the defense exhibition in Saarbruecken in March.

The mood on the scene has been heated up by the discussion of double citizenship, explained Fritsche. Besides that, the outcry of militant PKK adherents have increased the agitation from the "right." Rightwing groups who previously did not use violence have now resorted to force.

The "rightwing" parties have caught people's mood with increasing social and economic themes for some time now, stated Fritsche. In order to keep voters from slipping away, the DVU (Deutsche Volksunion) and REP (The Republicans) have been making mutual agreements. Fritsche's view: "We continue to have a considerable risk potential from rightwing extremists." There is enough for Constitutional Security to do in rendering the "rightwing rat catcher" harmless.


Germany could turn into a stage for rivalries between Serbs and Kosovo Albanians

Munich, Germany
March 23, 1999

Are open borders a danger for Bavaria?

From our correspondent Ewald Koenig

Munich. Bavaria's Interior Minister Guenther Beckstein sees a risk for domestic security in the activities of the Kosovo Liberation Army (UCK) in Germany, and is afraid that Germany, because of its open border with Austria, will become a stage for rivalries between Serbs and Kosovo Albanians. Beckstein told the "Presse", however, he knew that the Austrian authorities had recently taken this risk on with tighter police controls.

The UCK has been active a long time, Beckstein told the "Presse." "Under no circumstances may we have the least understanding that their political disputes will be carried out on German soil," said the CSU politician. At the present time there is no imminent danger, "but we'll keep out eyes wide open." In Bavaria alone there are currently 45,000 Kosovo Albanians.

All in all the security situation between Austria and Bavaria has hardly changed since the border checks have ended. People who enter Germany from Austria illegitimately are often caught in spot checks at the border or at traffic check points.

The President of the Bavarian Constitutional Security, Gerhard Forster, also verified that there was no evidence of an altered security situation with the opening of the border. On Monday, Beckstein and Forster presented the report of the Bavarian Constitutional Security. According to it, foreign extremism and rightwing extremism were on the decline in 1998. While the number of leftwing acts of violence fell from 833 to 783, they rose in Bavaria from 19 to 25. The reason for that is the Antifa movement for autonomy in the Passau area.

The "humanly contemptuous and totalitarian practices" of Scientology have often summoned Bavaria into battle. Since the sect has been under surveillance by the Constitutional Security agency, it has attempted, using the equivalent of 280 million Austrian shillings, to present itself as a harmless religious congregation.

Die Presse, Vienna


Beckstein: "More and more of the dark side of Scientology"

March 12, 1999 - Munich, Germany

+++ "Information and realization are among the most important tools in the dispute with Scientology. He who knows how the system works will hardly turn into a gullible victim of this organization. Because of this, I welcome the tens of thousands of citizens who have made requests for our information on Scientology," stated Interior Minister Dr. Guenther Beckstein joyfully. In the meantime, the third edition of the brochure on "The Scientology System," published by the Bavarian Interior Ministry, gives the answers to 25 questions on the propaganda facade of Scientology. Using original quotations, it shows how the Scientology system works, the methods used to get customers to buy personality training thereby pulling them into the machinery, and how one can protect himself from Scientology. +++

"We can prove that Scientology is contrary in many ways to the value and legal systems of our free democratic society and also works against these principles," said Beckstein on March 11, 1999 in Munich. The brochure had been introduced by Beckstein for the first time on June 4, 1998. The first two editions of 26,000 copies each were all given out within a few months each due to strong demand. The brochure is available [in German] on the internet at

http://www.innenministerium.bayern.de/scientology/index.htm

or can be ordered by telephone or fax. In addition, the brochure "Scientology - eine verfassungsfeindliche Bestrebung" is available on the internet. It puts together findings on the organization's constitutional hostility.

As the minister has explained in detail, Scientology is a financial institution which is active worldwide, is steered from the USA and is tightly controlled. It uses the partially unethical "hard sell" training methods to sell personality modification and management and operational techniques on the psychological market. "Good and evil, right and wrong are defined by Scientology exclusively in terms of their use for the system. According to the way Scientologists see things, they are permitted to commit crimes if that serves the organization. For the achievement of its goals, Scientology uses undue influencing, pressuring and intimidation techniques which extend far beyond influence peddling and lobbying into the areas of criminality," said the Minister. Numerous examples have proven how former members and critics - including journalists - have been intimidated and terrorized. To this end Scientology has its own secret intelligence service (OSA), which has been professionally trained in methods of psychological warfare. In its fight, this service uses the dirty methods used by the Stasi[1] in operative psychology to wear down regime opponents. Techniques of applied psychology are turned around for use as weapons. "The amount of conformity between the operative psychology of the Stasi and the battle psychology of Scientology is astonishing," said Beckstein.

Beckstein also mentioned that before anything else, the victims of Scientology had to receive better assistance. For this reason a victim counselling center was set up as a pilot project by the State Youth Office. It started in July 1998 and is available by telephone in Munich. It is meant to help victims in the widest sense, that means Scientologists, former Scientologists, family members and partners in the situations in which they are having personal problem. The Bavarian State Office for Constitutional Security also has a number for confidential contact by victims, relatives, or those who wish to get out.

1. Stasi: State Security agency of former East Germany

Original German article


Stamm: concept of the Scientology counseling center passed the test

Bavaria/Social/Scientology
March 9, 1999

Munich (KNA) The concept of the central Scientology crisis counseling center in Munich has checked out for the best, according to Social Minister Barbara Stamm (CSU). The rest of Bavaria would do well to take up the offer of counselling over the phone which has been in place for nine months. By the end of February more than 100 cases had been registered. The position, which was established by the Bavarian State Office of Youth, offers victims of the Scientology organization and their relatives assistance with detailed individual and technical counselling.

An important component, according to Stamm, is a close cooperation with functioning psycho-social counselling centers, therapists and attorneys. Counselling by telephone enables uncomplicated access for callers and lowers the threshold for those who want to remain anonymous. The Minister stated that the concept would be carried on and further developed. Parents, brothers and sisters make up the greatest portion of callers, with 45 cases in that category. A case worker with technical knowledge of Scientology and a psychologist are available for crisis center counselling.

[contact info given]

psl

knafw

091408 MAR 99 nnnn


Beckstein criticizes Washington

"Mehmet" case in human rights report

From: "Sueddeutsche Zeitung"
March 1, 1999

"Even criminals in the USA feel of the sting of the law."

Munich (dpa/AFP) - the mention of the "Mehmet" case in the US State Department's human rights report struck a note of discord with Bavaria's Minister of the Interior Guenther Beckstein (CSU). He asks what the deportation of the 14 year old serial criminal to Turkey has to do with the report, said Beckstein. Even foreign criminals in the USA are "known to feel the extreme sting of the local law," all the way up to the death penalty. Beckstein also protested criticism about the sending back of former Bosnian civil war refugees.

The US report differs from former years in that it does not support the accusations of the Scientology organization of an alleged persecution of its members in Germany, but only refers to them. To that Beckstein said that once more the Scientology propaganda is not being critically scrutinized. However, the broad presentation of the German position is cause for hope that it is also recognized in the USA that Scientology is a "totalitarian organization."

The Munich internet judgment against the Compuserve internet provider also had a place in the report. The case was cited for the "yet unclear" effects that the German multi-media law could have on internet providers. A Compuserve manager was sentenced in May to two years imprisonment suspended and 100,000 marks fine for distribution of child pornography on the internet.


Former Scientology Member states:
Judges are intentionally intimidated

From: "Main Echo"
November 19, 1998

Munich. According to the testimony of a prominent former member, the Scientology organization systematically influences judges who are involved in Scientology cases. First data about the judge is collected, then friends and associates are queried, reported Jesse Prince, Scientologist from 1976 to 1992, member of management for years, as relayed by the Bavarian Interior Ministry on Thursday. Nothing specific is known about German cases.

According to Prince's statement, the intimidation tactics are based on "The Art of War", a Chinese book written over 2,400 years ago by Sun Tzu. Documents about the judges which are collected include tax statements, bank data, medical records and tape recordings. In the second stage, Scientology attempts to influence the environment of the judge by means of middlemen. If that does not succeed, then Scientology will stage an incident, perhaps a "sex trap."

The organization once expended $260,000 for that reason, in order to bring a judge onto a yacht in Florida together with two prostitutes, the Ministry cited the report which had been presented to it. Since Scientology is centrally directed, this kind of testimony about methods of procedure in the USA also has significance for evaluation in Germany. Tactical withdrawals of member organizations, such as can presently be observed today in Germany, are nothing other than part of the overall anti-constitutional strategy of Scientology.

http://www.main-echo.de/HTML/inland/2011/featscien.html


Stern-TV, 11-18-1998, Transcript of the documentary part of the show

(The second part is part of a talk show)

Off Screen speaker (OS): Bernhard Aigner in front of the Munich Scientology Center. The 38 year old Bavarian is at his wit's end. He has nightmares, he can't sleep. One and a half years ago his brother collapsed in these rooms. Acute shortness of breath, coma. For 22 years, Konrad Aigner was a member of Scientology; the psycho-sect turned him into a mental wreck. He popped vitamin pills by the handful; he thought he would never get sick. Nevertheless Konrad Aigner died after being in a coma for three weeks.

Bernhard_Aigner: My completely clear opinion about it is: if he would not have been with the Scientologists, if he would not have been a Scientologist, then he could still be alive.

OS: Konrad Aigner was a man of the earth, happy, a true Bavarian, family man with six brothers and sisters. He came from Ruhmannsaigen, a sleepy little village with seven houses close to the Austrian border. Here, everyone is devoutly Catholic. What Konrad could have been looking for in Scientology, the family could never understand.

The Aigner matriarch: I was always asking him, Konrad, you don't need them. You have a mind of your own. Successful is what he wanted to be, he strove for success. You already have that . . . You're young and healthy. I was not able to do anything.

OS: After his death, disaster struck his family. Konrad Aigner only left debts behind.

B_Aigner: That was a shock to us. We were well aware that he was a Scientologist, but we didn't know how deep he was into it.

OS: That wasn't the worst of it. After Konrad's death, his family found very peculiar documents in a storage area near his room: records in which two Scientologists described how they wanted to get at Konrad Aigner's money. Terms and symbols which the family did not at first understand.

Document Excerpt: "Konrad Aigner has been in Scientology for 16 years + has not yet managed to go clear, that is, to go up the bridge, but is always falling off the bridge . . ."

OS: "Clear", that is, according to the promises of the psycho-sect, a higher state of awareness. The way there is called the "Bridge" and it consists of dozens of expensive courses in which one must subject himself to questionable psychological techniques. Two examples are intensive interrogation and hours of sitting and staring. We inquired as to which status Konrad Aigner had in Scientology, and were granted a rare interview.

Interviewer (I): Had he really obtained the status of "clear"?

Johann Altendorfer, Scientology Speaker Munich: No.

I: But he had it at one time?

Altendorfer: No.

I: I've seen a certificate which stated he had the status of "clear".

Altendorfer: My understanding is that he didn't have it.

OS: Peculiar: In Konrad Aigner's estate Scientology had certified that not only was he actually "clear", but had been since 1984. In spite of that, the Scientologists were able to talk him into thinking that he had to reach this status again, although he had already paid for many expensive courses.

Document Excerpt: "Konrad needed 37,000 to clear,... Konrad had the problem that he did not want his parents finding out anything about the matter. I told him that we would go to them + that we would tell them that it was for SCN + that we would handle them . . . Konrad did not want that + was totally afraid that all hell would break loose with his family."

OS: That was because Konrad Aigner was responsible for the money. In 1985, his father had naively put him in charge of the family's estate.

B_Aigner: Our father had signed over the estate and property over to him in 1985 because he was the most down-to-earth, the most manually gifted of all of us, and this was the reason he could also take out loans on these properties.

OS: Only one month after the estate transfer took place, Konrad Aigner went to the bank and took out a 50,000 DM [1.6 deutchmark approx. = $1]. Today Scientology pretends that only small sums of money were involved.

Altendorfer, Scientology Munich: Konrad Aigner was in Scientology about 22 years, and if you calculate that out, then he may have paid 500-600 DM per month.

OS: In only six months in 1989, over 70,000 DM were taken in, according to the sect's own accounts. Right after his military service, Aigner worked as a switchman and bus driver with the transportation department. During that time he made contact with Scientology. Presumably, he was fascinated with the promises of L. Ron Hubbard:

L Ron Hubbard: If one knows certain things and applies them, it improves the intelligence of a person.

OS: But Konrad Aigner only earned 2,000 DM net pay. When he ran out of money again, the Scientologists had an idea for him.

Document Excerpt: "We then went to Raiffeisenbank in Triftern + they had immediately declared themselves ready to lend 200,000 DM on the property, but in order to get it Konrad's parents had to have their signatures notarized."

OS: And Konrad Aigner actually took out a 200,000 DM mortgage [Grundschuld] at the notary's. After his death, his brothers and sisters had to pool their money together just to be able to save their parents' house. Pastures, fields and woods had to be sold. Today the 76 year old matriarch has to operate a small beverage store, otherwise there wouldn't be enough money. She recalls how much pressure her son was under in the early 1990's:

Aigner Matriarch: "Mama," he said, "I have learned something, that if I were to tell you what it was, you would fall down dead." Well, what was that supposed to mean. I didn't ask him about it any more. I thought I would do that some other time. That was not exactly the right point in time.

OS: Aigner also confided in his friend, Dr. Stephan Gemen. The country doctor was supposed to help Aigner get out.

Stephen Gemen: I was supposed to write up an attestation. And as to my question what he wanted to do with that, he said: Yes, he would like to get out. And he could really only do that if he could proved to them up there - that is how he called them - that he had changed for the worse.

OS: However the sect did not want to let him go. Again and again Scientologists sought out contact with Aigner, even people he had never met before showed up looking for him.

Excerpt from letter: "Unfortunately I only know you from our rolodex but would like to meet you once in person."

OS: Aigner changed entirely, it was as if he had put on a completely different personality. For hours he lay around apathetically on the sofa.

B_Aigner: He used to be the life of the party. He was a happy person, full of vitality, and then he became the opposite. He would just lie around on the couch without taking part in anything, brooding, laid around the whole day, was no longer into things. It looked as if he was in a different time zone.

OS: July 21, 1997. As an independent bus driver, Aigner was just making ends meet. He often drove for Scientology, as he was doing on this day. After returning from a trip he collapsed in the Munich Center. For three weeks he lie in a coma in intensive care. Then one organ after the next failed. Aigner died of multiple organ failure. It had been thought that he was robust and healthy. The police searched the Scientology buildings and investigated for a year, but there were no poisons in Aigner's body. The witnesses, Scientologists, told the police that they had taken immediate action as soon as it was a recognizable emergency. The proceedings were suspended.

Konrad Aigner's room in Ruhmannsaigen, empty and desolate. However, his family will not get over his death for a long.

B_Aigner: His destruction was complete in every regard: psychologically, financially, . . . he was at rock bottom. And the Scientologists are still saying: "I would rather have you dead than incapable." That is how I see what happened to my brother.

Return


Stern-TV

November 18, 1998

Transcript of the documentary part of the show


Off Screen speaker (OS): Bernhard Aigner in front of the Munich Scientology Center. The 38 year old Bavarian is at his wit's end. He has nightmares, he can't sleep. One and a half years ago his brother collapsed in these rooms. Acute shortness of breath, coma. For 22 years, Konrad Aigner was a member of Scientology; the psycho-sect turned him into a mental wreck. He popped vitamin pills by the handful; he thought he would never get sick. Nevertheless Konrad Aigner died after being in a coma for three weeks.

Bernhard_Aigner: My completely clear opinion about it is: if he would not have been with the Scientologists, if he would not have been a Scientologist, then he could still be alive.

OS: Konrad Aigner was a man of the earth, happy, a true Bavarian, family man with six brothers and sisters. He came from Ruhmannsaigen, a sleepy little village with seven houses close to the Austrian border. Here, everyone is devoutly Catholic. What Konrad could have been looking for in Scientology, the family could never understand.

The Aigner matriarch: I was always asking him, Konrad, you don't need them. You have a mind of your own. Successful is what he wanted to be, he strove for success. You already have that . . . You're young and healthy. I was not able to do anything.

OS: After his death, disaster struck his family. Konrad Aigner only left debts behind.

B_Aigner: That was a shock to us. We were well aware that he was a Scientologist, but we didn't know how deep he was into it.


OS: That wasn't the worst of it. After Konrad's death, his family found very peculiar documents in a storage area near his room: records in which two Scientologists described how they wanted to get at Konrad Aigner's money. Terms and symbols which the family did not at first understand.


Document Excerpt: "Konrad Aigner has been in Scientology for 16 years + has not yet managed to go clear, that is, to go up the bridge, but is always falling off the bridge . . ."



OS: "Clear", that is, according to the promises of the psycho-sect, a higher state of awareness. The way there is called the "Bridge" and it consists of dozens of expensive courses in which one must subject himself to questionable psychological techniques. Two examples are intensive interrogation and hours of sitting and staring. We inquired as to which status Konrad Aigner had in Scientology, and were granted a rare interview..


Interviewer (I): Had he really obtained the status of "clear"?

Johann Altendorfer, Scientology Speaker Munich: No.

I: But he had it at one time?

Altendorfer: No.

I: I've seen a certificate which stated he had the status of "clear".

Altendorfer: My understanding is that he didn't have it.

OS: Peculiar: In Konrad Aigner's estate Scientology had certified that not only was he actually "clear", but had been since 1984. In spite of that, the Scientologists were able to talk him into thinking that he had to reach this status again, although he had already paid for many expensive courses.






Document Excerpt: "Konrad needed 37,000 to clear,... Konrad had the problem that he did not want his parents finding out anything about the matter. I told him that we would go to them + that we would tell them that it was for SCN + that we would handle them . . . Konrad did not want that + was totally afraid that all hell would break loose with his family."


OS: That was because Konrad Aigner was responsible for the money. In 1985, his father had naively put him in charge of the family's estate.



B_Aigner: Our father had signed over the estate and property over to him in 1985 because he was the most down-to-earth, the most manually gifted of all of us, and this was the reason he could also take out loans on these properties.

OS: Only one month after the estate transfer took place, Konrad Aigner went to the bank and took out a 50,000 DM [1.6 deutchmark approx. = $1]. Today Scientology pretends that only small sums of money were involved.


Altendorfer, Scientology Munich: Konrad Aigner was in Scientology about 22 years, and if you calculate that out, then he may have paid 500-600 DM per month.


OS: In only six months in 1989, over 70,000 DM were taken in, according to the sect's own accounts. Right after his military service, Aigner worked as a switchman and bus driver with the transportation department. During that time he made contact with Scientology. Presumably, he was fascinated with the promises of L. Ron Hubbard:


L Ron Hubbard: If one knows certain things and applies them, it improves the intelligence of a person.




OS: But Konrad Aigner only earned 2,000 DM net pay. When he ran out of money again, the Scientologists had an idea for him.


Document Excerpt: "We then went to Raiffeisenbank in Triftern + they had immediately declared themselves ready to lend 200,000 DM on the property, but in order to get it Konrad's parents had to have their signatures notarized."


OS: And Konrad Aigner actually took out a 200,000 DM mortgage [Grundschuld] at the notary's. After his death, his brothers and sisters had to pool their money together just to be able to save their parents' house. Pastures, fields and woods had to be sold. Today the 76 year old matriarch has to operate a small beverage store, otherwise there wouldn't be enough money. She recalls how much pressure her son was under in the early 1990's:
Aigner Matriarch: "Mama," he said, "I have learned something, that if I were to tell you what it was, you would fall down dead." Well, what was that supposed to mean. I didn't ask him about it any more. I thought I would do that some other time. That was not exactly the right point in time.


OS: Aigner also confided in his friend, Dr. Stephan Gemen. The country doctor was supposed to help Aigner get out.
Stephen Gemen: I was supposed to write up an attestation. And as to my question what he wanted to do with that, he said: Yes, he would like to get out. And he could really only do that if he could proved to them up there - that is how he called them - that he had changed for the worse.

OS: However the sect did not want to let him go. Again and again Scientologists sought out contact with Aigner, even people he had never met before showed up looking for him.

Excerpt from letter: "Unfortunately I only know you from our rolodex but would like to meet you once in person."
OS: Aigner changed entirely, it was as if he had put on a completely different personality. For hours he lay around apathetically on the sofa.

B_Aigner: He used to be the life of the party. He was a happy person, full of vitality, and then he became the opposite. He would just lie around on the couch without taking part in anything, brooding, laid around the whole day, was no longer into things. It looked as if he was in a different time zone.

OS: July 21, 1997. As an independent bus driver, Aigner was just making ends meet. He often drove for Scientology, as he was doing on this day. After returning from a trip he collapsed in the Munich Center. For three weeks he lie in a coma in intensive care. Then one organ after the next failed. Aigner died of multiple organ failure. It had been thought that he was robust and healthy. The police searched the Scientology buildings and investigated for a year, but there were no poisons in Aigner's body. The witnesses, Scientologists, told the police that they had taken immediate action as soon as it was a recognizable emergency. The proceedings were suspended.


Konrad Aigner's room in Ruhmannsaigen, empty and desolate. However, his family will not get over his death for a long.


B_Aigner: His destruction was complete in every regard: psychologically, financially, . . . he was at rock bottom. And the Scientologists are still saying: "I would rather have you dead than incapable." That is how I see what happened to my brother.


Return


It seems as though Scientology will continue to be observed by German domestic intelligence agents (Verfassungsschützer)

From: "Yahoo! Headlines Politics"
Sonntag, 15. November 1998, 11:17 Uhr

Munich (AP) The Constitutional Protection agency favors the continued surveillance of the Scientology organization, according to the "Focus" news magazine. The paper referred to a report made the previous Sunday in an interim report by the secret service agents, who are to address the Interior Ministry Conference at the end of the week.

In their report the agents stated that after one year of surveillance there were still gaps in their findings, for instance in the activities of the organization in political areas, reported "Focus." Scientology had anticipated the surveillance, for example, and party members had been told not to reveal their connections with Scientology. Therefore reliable statements about the influence of the Scientologists in state offices are not yet possible. There is also a further need for clarification as to the financing and the operations of the Scientology intelligence service, OSA, in Germany.

AP-Nachrichten - The Associated Press News Service
Copyright 1998 The Associated Press, All Rights Reserved

[Note: German surveillance of Scientology does not include opening of mail or tapping of telephones.]


FOCUS Press Release
November 15, 1998

Interim Report of the Constitutional Protection Agency
confirms constitutional enmity of the Scientology organization

Munich. "Scientology is hostile to the fundamental order of liberal democracy." The program and operations of the Scientology organization has, as its goal, "the removal, fundamentally and permanently," of constitutional order. The Constitutional Protection Agency came to this conclusion after one year's surveillance, reported the news magazine FOCUS, referring to the interim report, which will be presented the end of this week at the Interior Minister's Conference.

From the perspective of the constitutional agents the area of "activities in politics" has not yet been satisfactorily researched. Scientology had prepared itself for the surveillance. Scientologists in political parties had been told not to reveal their membership in Scientology. Therefore, reliable statements as to what share the Scientologists have in party offices are not possible.

The constitutional agents also see a need for further explanation as to the financing of the organization and the operations of the Scientology intelligence service, OSA, in Germany. The agents believe that from a "technical perspective", further surveillance is indicated.

by FOCUS Magazin-Verlag GmbH

[Note: German surveillance of Scientology does not include opening of mail or tapping of telephones.]


Infiltration fails

State Security: Scientology not able to gain ground in Germany

From: "Süddeutsche Zeitung - 23.09.98, Politik"
September 23, 1998

The widely reported attempt by the Scientology sect to systematically infiltrate politics and the economy in Germany never got off the ground. According to a states security agency internal report, the Scientology infiltration of the civil service failed. Of the 3.2 million public employees, only 48 of them are Scientology members, according to the report. 14 separated from the service because of their membership in the sect; three were furloughed. For 16, membership could not be confirmed in the sect which maximizes profits and which has been categorized by German politicians as despising people. Things appear similar in the economy. Nationwide only 150 small companies are influenced by Scientology. The report, which has not yet been published, came to the conclusion, "It is hardly likely that there is a systematic infiltration of the German economy by Scientology."

Bavaria and Baden-Wurttemberg were particularly involved in the sect's surveillance, which had been decided upon nationwide a year ago. Domestic security agents determined who most of the members were. There is reported to be about 2,000 in the south and the southwest; compared to that only 25-30 Scientologists live in the new German states as far as the observing agencies can tell. In all of Germany, the total number lies "significantly under 10,000," according to the report.

Heber Jentzsch, the American President of the Scientology enterprise, has been telling his members for years to build "personal communication lines" with influential members of society such as politicians, judges and state attorneys, banks and artists. They were also to attain positions in companies and then take "control over this area." State security sees a significant discrepancy between the grandiose expansion announcements of the Scientologists and reality. So many branches of the sect are plagued by debt that expansion is out of the question. The most important theory of the Scientologists does seem to function, "Make money, make more money." In any case, the sect denies financial difficulties.

According to what state security has seen, only three Scientologists have gained access to the parties: two to the CDU, and one to the FDP. These parties are moving to exclude them. Scientologists occasionally show up in the police or in schools. A teacher used sect material in her class and was replaced as a result. Even the sect's personal secret service, OSA, which had previously been categorized as dangerous, does not appear particularly fearsome to state security. The Bavarian security agency reported on OSA members who had been trained in intelligence methods and who were attempting counter-surveillance. The professional security agents came to the conclusion that their "use was dilettantish and was not able to negatively influence state surveillance work." The sect secret service appears "to act as a kind of plant security for the Scientology business."

Annette Ramelsberger


Record of Destruction

A Look Into the
Secret Personnel Records
of Scientology

From: "Sueddeutsche Zeitung Magazin"
August 21, 1998

The Extended Suffering of Konrad Aigner
How Scientology Destroys People.
A Case Study with Deadly Consequence.

by Michaela Haas

1. "We would rather have you dead than incapable."
HUBBARD COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE, OCTOBER 12, 1985

For his friends from earlier, Konrad Aigner lives on as if nothing had ever happened. Hardly a week goes by in which he does not receive mail from Scientology. Several days ago, according to Konrad's brother, Bernhard, a letter addressed to Konrad came which proclaimed, "Please share your greatest Scientology success with us." Bernhard Aigner said, "I sent them a copy of Konrad's obituary after I wrote on it, 'Your greatest success was my death on August 11, 1997,' we want to finally mourn in peace."

The Scientologists would have to realize the fact of the matter, because it was in their Munich branch on Beich Street that Konrad collapsed on July 21, 1997. The emergency doctor came about 10 o'clock at night, and three weeks later Aigner died in the Schwabinger Hospital without ever coming out of the coma again. Even though he was a chain smoker and a coffee drinker, it was unusual and puzzling to the doctors that one organ failed after the next without responding to treatment in a 43 year old man. Normally, only elderly people die of this "multi- organ failure." The doctors immediately ordered an autopsy. The result of this was that Aigner had died of an infectious disease. The state attorney will not be more specific because of privacy law. It is a diagnosis which is as ambiguous as it is vague. On February 10, 1998, 130 police and 4 state attorneys searched the Munich Scientology Center to answer, among other things: why did Konrad Aigner die?

The Aigner family perceives derision in a sentence from an instruction of the Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard, "We would rather have you dead than incapable."

2. "Make money, make more money."
L. RON HUBBARD

Konrad Aigner was in Scientology for 23 years. That is the controversial psycho-business which calls itself a church, and which counts only 10,000 members in Germany since domestic intelligence put it under surveillance. Scientology puts the number of its members at more like 30,000. When Konrad Aigner died, he left behind a legacy which his family had not counted on: debt in the amount of six digits. His parents found piles of "donation receipts" of the organization in his room - and two extraordinary documents: hand-written records from 1990. In those, two Scientologist women detailed on thirty pages, step by step, how they tried to borrow money for a total of 200,000 marks - an exemplary document never before published in the German press which shows how Scientologists rip off their members. The report begins in the artificially cryptic speech which is typical for Scientology:

Konrad Aigner has been in Scientology for 16 years + has not yet got it together with going clear, that is, going up the bridge, rather, he is always falling from the bridge and has drunk alcohol, etc. We (G. + I) have therefore decided several weeks ago to help him get it together and finally get him up the bridge. Konrad Aigner has some property (pastureland, forests + acreage + farmhouse) in Lower Bavaria which belongs to him, but his parents live there and have usage rights (or something like that) to these properties. Several years ago, Konrad had already borrowed 50,000 marks on this land + put it on his account in Copenhagen. His parents had to co-sign and Konrad lied to them at the time + said he took the money "if something needed doing around the house."

Konrad Aigner grew up with six brothers and sisters in Ruhmannsaigen, a small hamlet by Pfarrkirchen in Lower Bavaria. Little of an organization by the name of Scientology had been heard in this ultra Catholic, firmly established community. It was not until the mid 1970's that Konrad happened upon the psycho-business when he moved to Munich to work for the department of transportation as a bus driver - as did many others in this time frame, long before Scientology's humanly contemptible methods were known to the public. Made curious by his brother's narratives, Bernhard Aigner, 37 years old at the time, also visited the Munich Center. "I took one of those personality tests that Scientology uses to snare people," he said. "There were loud, friendly people there, many young, good-looking women, it was easy to be dazzled in there [literally: "you could go blind in there"]. Konrad was a good-natured, gullible farmer's boy - the ideal victim for Scientology."

Konrad Aigner was brimming with humor, always so raucous and gleefully happy, that his best friend, a doctor by the name of Stephan Gemen, occasionally became skeptical. The two had gotten to know each other while in the Federal Defense Force. He had often asked himself, said Gemen, how much, behind his [cheerful] facade, it bothered Konrad that he was not the best-looking guy with his small, thick stature and thinning hair. He was as anti-soldier as Schweik [a fictional draftee of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire]. He tried so hard, but he just could not do it."

Scientology did not only promise money, success and recognition to the bus driver, who was still young at the time, and who was happy neither in work nor in love. The organization had something higher in mind for him. They wanted to make a "clear" out of him, a perfect, psychically purged "super-human." The training, however, cost more money than the bus driver made in the civil service.

Konrad needed 37,000 more marks to clear, therefore we went to his bank in Augsburg + asked if we could borrow 37,000 more on the properties. (...) From the start, Konrad had the problem that he did not want his parents to know anything about the matter. I told him that we would go to them + that we would tell them that it was for Scientology + that we would handle them for him. I told him that I was there to help him. (I had already done that frequently), Konrad did not want that + had total fear of the devil for his family.

"We had thought," said his 76 year old mother, Anna, "that Konrad was paying membership fees, but we had no idea that they wanted so much money." The seven family members had always agreed, "Konrad is the most honest, most solid, most manually gifted, he should take over the farm."

Today, Berhard Aigner knows, "We were fooling ourselves." On the same day that his father signed the farm over to Konrad, Konrad secretly surrendered the land. He took out a loan. Bills prove that he had signed over more than 85,000 marks to the organization in the first six months. For an "intensive of auditing" which is a type of interrogation, Scientology charged 6,750 marks (about $5,000). Bernhard Aigner has calculated that his brother must have signed over about 600,000 marks altogether. "He never took a vacation, he could never afford anything, and he still left nothing behind but debt."

3. "Clears do not get colds."
L. RON HUBBARD

There was an open argument between Konrad and his family a single time. On April 2, 1997, there was a broadcast on television about the mysterious deaths of seven Scientologists. The case of the 36-year-old Lisa McPherson from Florida, who also had wanted to leave the organization, was described. After several peculiar episodes, one of which was a traffic accident, McPherson fell into a coma and died. The cause of death was listed as a bacterial infection. The American police were investigating as to whether Scientology was giving the young woman high doses of vitamin preparations instead of effective medication - high enough doses which, if taken over a long period of time without medical supervision, could have caused internal organ damage. Konrad Aigner did not want to sit through the entire broadcast; he angrily left the room saying, "How good they can act!"

On Thursday, July 17, 1997, Konrad Aigner received a call sometime after 9 p.m. "Yes, yes, that's clear, I'll come immediately." With beads of sweat on his forehead, he packed his things, and shortly before midnight he and his bus were on their way to Munich, said his brother. At that point, he had a slight cold, but was otherwise, in the opinion of his family, healthy. On Sunday, a colleague reached him on the bus telephone. Aigner sounded as if he could not stand up or talk straight, is what the man recalls. "All out," is all Aigner said, "I can not explain to you, all out."

On the same day, he caused an accident with his bus. Whether that was before or after the phone call could not be determined afterwards. On Monday he was supposed to drive several Scientologists to Frankfurt for a demonstration "for religious freedom." On Sunday evening, accompanied by two other Scientologists, he hectically rented two new busses. The car rental agent was the last non-Scientologist to see Konrad Aigner before his collapse. He said that Konrad had appeared as though he was under pressure, "He was cut and dried."

There was another traffic accident with one of the rented busses, which was driven by a 19 year old. After that, a room waiter in a hotel in Frankfurt allegedly noticed that Konrad was not at all doing well. Nevertheless, the Scientologists later drove together with him back to Munich. Neither Konrad's condition nor who drove the vehicles is clear - the Scientologists refused to give details. Around ten o'clock at night, Aigner collapsed in the Scientology center. "No acute event," noted the emergency doctor who had to report the collapse in the final days.

For Bernhard Aigner, Scientology is responsible for the death of his brother, "help was called too late, after nothing more could have been done. That is why I am going after them, because they let the whole weekend go by. If they noticed on Sunday morning that he was not doing well, then he needed help - help from a doctor, not from Scientology. ' If he had not been with them, he could have still been alive."

Konrad Aigner no longer had any medical insurance. He believed that Scientology could protect him from illness. In his most sold book, "Dianetics," (first edition 1950), Hubbard promised his adherents that arthritis, allergies, ulcers and a long list of other complaints would be "healed without exception" "with the help of Dianetic therapy", which means Scientology teachings. It alleged "a fact proved by research: clears do not get colds."

As a rule, the "therapy" consists of expensive counseling, vitamins, and going into the sauna for four to eight hours at a stretch. In Konrad's belongings, the state attorney's office found not only the records and invoices, but also boxes of high dosages of vitamin preparations, addresses of Scientology drug stores, and pages of instructions for the so-called "purification rundown," which is supposed to detoxify body and spirit. It states that after one hour of jogging, "then spending about 4 hrs. in the sauna, during which time the heat is gradually increased. (...) (There) are salt tablets and also potassium available, if necessary, in case one detects physical difficulties such as faintness or nausea in the sauna."

In the weeks following, Bernhard Aigner repeatedly drove down to see the Munich Scientologists. "If nothing else, those were the people who had been together with Konrad during his last days. I wanted to know what had happened on that weekend, but I never got any information."

Scientology denies any responsibility. Never, asserted Johann Altendorfer, press representative of the organization, had anyone "advised Konrad to buy or consume pills or other preparations." In order to legally insure themselves, Scientology has their members sign a form before undergoing the torture of the purification rundown. As though Hubbard had never given his promise of eternal health, it states on the form, "I understand that Scientology is not intended to handle or cure physical illnesses. I and my heirs hereby renounce and abandon forever all foreseeable and non-foreseeable claims and specifications, actions, demands, rights, damages, injustices, expenses and losses against persons or owners of Scientology.


Records of Destruction

A Look Into the
Secret Personnel Records
of Scientology

From: "Sueddeutsche Zeitung Magazin"
August 21, 1998

The Extended Suffering of Konrad Aigner
How Scientology Destroys People.
A Case Study with Deadly Consequence.

by Michaela Haas

1. "We would rather have you dead than incapable."
HUBBARD COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE, OCTOBER 12, 1985

For his friends from earlier, Konrad Aigner lives on as if nothing had ever happened. Hardly a week goes by in which he does not receive mail from Scientology. Several days ago, according to Konrad's brother, Bernhard, a letter addressed to Konrad came which proclaimed, "Please share your greatest Scientology success with us." Bernhard Aigner said, "I sent them a copy of Konrad's obituary after I wrote on it, 'Your greatest success was my death on August 11, 1997,' we want to finally mourn in peace."

The Scientologists would have to realize the fact of the matter, because it was in their Munich branch on Beich Street that Konrad collapsed on July 21, 1997. The emergency doctor came about 10 o'clock at night, and three weeks later Aigner died in the Schwabinger Hospital without ever coming out of the coma again. Even though he was a chain smoker and a coffee drinker, it was unusual and puzzling to the doctors that one organ failed after the next without responding to treatment in a 43 year old man. Normally, only elderly people die of this "multi- organ failure." The doctors immediately ordered an autopsy. The result of this was that Aigner had died of an infectious disease. The state attorney will not be more specific because of privacy law. It is a diagnosis which is as ambiguous as it is vague. On February 10, 1998, 130 police and 4 state attorneys searched the Munich Scientology Center to answer, among other things: why did Konrad Aigner die?

The Aigner family perceives derision in a sentence from an instruction of the Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard, "We would rather have you dead than incapable."

2. "Make money, make more money."
L. RON HUBBARD

Konrad Aigner was in Scientology for 23 years. That is the controversial psycho-business which calls itself a church, and which counts only 10,000 members in Germany since domestic intelligence put it under surveillance. Scientology puts the number of its members at more like 30,000. When Konrad Aigner died, he left behind a legacy which his family had not counted on: debt in the amount of six figures. His parents found piles of "donation receipts" of the organization in his room - and two extraordinary documents: hand-written records from 1990. In those, two Scientologist women detailed on thirty pages, step by step, how they tried to borrow money for a total of 200,000 marks - an exemplary document never before published in the German press which shows how Scientologists rip off their members. The report begins in the artificially cryptic speech which is typical for Scientology:

Konrad Aigner has been in Scientology for 16 years + has not yet managed to go clear, that is, go up the bridge, rather, he is always falling from the bridge and has drunk alcohol, etc. Therefore, we (G. + I) decided several weeks ago to help him get it together and finally get him up the bridge. Konrad Aigner has some property (pasture land, forests + acreage + farmhouse) in Lower Bavaria which belongs to him, but his parents live there and have usage rights (or something like that) to these properties. Several years ago, Konrad had already borrowed 50,000 marks on this land + put it on his account in Copenhagen. His parents had to co-sign and Konrad lied to them at the time + said he took the money "if something needed doing around the house."

Konrad Aigner grew up with six brothers and sisters in Ruhmannsaigen, a small hamlet by Pfarrkirchen in Lower Bavaria. Little of an organization by the name of Scientology had been heard in this ultra Catholic, firmly established community. It was not until the mid 1970's when he moved to Munich to work for the department of transportation as a bus driver that Konrad happened upon the psycho-business - as did many others in this time frame, long before Scientology's humanly contemptible methods were known to the public. Made curious by his brother's narratives, Bernhard Aigner, 37 years old at the time, also visited the Munich Center. "I took one of those personality tests that Scientology uses to snare people," he said. "There were loud, friendly people there, many young, good-looking women, it was easy to be dazzled in there [literally: "you could go blind in there"]. Konrad was a good-natured, gullible farmer's boy - the ideal victim for Scientology."

Konrad Aigner was brimming with humor, always so raucous and gleefully happy, that his best friend, a doctor by the name of Stephan Gemen, occasionally became skeptical. The two had gotten to know each other while in the Federal Defense Force. He had often asked himself, said Gemen, how much, behind his [cheerful] facade, it bothered Konrad that he was not the best-looking guy with his small, thick stature and thinning hair. He was as anti-soldier as Schweik [a fictional draftee of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire]. He tried so hard, but he just could not do it."

Scientology did not only promise money, success and recognition to the bus driver, who was still young at the time, and who was happy neither in work nor in romance. The organization had something higher in mind for him. They wanted to make a "clear" out of him, a perfect, psychically purged "super-human." The training, however, cost more money than the bus driver made in the civil service.

Konrad needed 37,000 more marks to clear, therefore we went to his bank in Augsburg + asked if we could borrow 37,000 more on the properties. (...) From the start, Konrad had the problem that he did not want his parents to know anything about the matter. I told him that we would go to them + that we would tell them that it was for Scientology + that we would handle them for him. I told him that I was there to help him. (I had already done that frequently), Konrad did not want that + had total fear of the devil of his family.

"We had thought," said his 76 year old mother, Anna, "that Konrad was paying membership fees, but we had no idea that they wanted so much money." The seven family members had always agreed, "Konrad is the most honest, most solid, most manually gifted, he should take over the farm."

Today, Bernhard Aigner knows, "We were fooling ourselves." On the same day that his father signed the farm over to Konrad, Konrad secretly surrendered the land. He took out a loan. Bills prove that he had signed over more than 85,000 marks to the organization in the first six months. For an "intensive of auditing" which is a type of interrogation, Scientology charged 6,750 marks (about $5,000). Bernhard Aigner has calculated that his brother must have signed over about 600,000 marks altogether. "He never took a vacation, he could never afford anything, and he still left nothing behind but debt."

When the Augsburg Bank raised objections because of the money I had the idea that we go to a bank in Lower Bavaria which was closer to the properties + was familiar with them, then we would have a better chance. So we went to Raiffeisen Bank in Triftern and they stated they were immediately ready to loan 200,000 marks for the properties, but Konrad's parents would have to sign in front of a notary public.

(2nd record:) In the meantime we had to handle Konrad again, because he needed the signatures of his parents to raise the mortgage, which he was not able to confront. First we went to the bank, I went in with Konrad and he introduced me as an acquaintance. I had taken off my wedding band so that they could have taken me for Konrad's fiance.

(1st record:) Konrad had called up his parents + told them to go to the notary public + said he would need the money "in order to get something done around the house etc." + they had signed. He had also told the same story to the bank. (...) Well good, that was the first cycle.

(2nd record:) It was a win all the way down the line.

Again and again, Konrad wanted to leave. He told his mother, "Mama, I want to leave them. I have experienced something so terrible, that if I were to tell you, you would fall down dead." Before the records were produced in March, 1990, these references abounded. To his friend, Stephan Gemen, Konrad Aigner appeared "turned around 180 degrees: oppressed and depressed. Aigner asked the doctor for an attestation which confirmed that he had changed for the worse, "so that I can prove to them that they have not kept the promises they made to me." He talked about his debts and said, "I have finally seen through that group. I want out of there." Gemen advised his friend to leave immediately. After that discussion, Aigner did not appear for a long time. When Stephan Gemen asked him about it later, Aigner brusquely brushed him off. "I had the impression that they had prohibited him from having contact with me. It seemed to me like his judgment had been altered. [literally: brainwashed]"

The records also document that Konrad Aigner protested again and again. After the bank had approved the first loan, the two Scientology women urged Aigner to borrow still more money and lend another financially strapped Scientologist 50,000 marks.

He was very bitter, he spit venom at us like an adder. We found out (...) that he had counter-intentions with the plan. R. put his head on straight for him.

When the bank became suspicious after more loan applications and demanded proof of the alleged renovations of his parent's house, the two Scientologist women finagled him some faked documents:

Then we managed to get two bills for Aigner, 1 from H. Transporte for a small shipment and (20,000.-) 1 from my husband for renovation work (50,000.-). We were as cool as could be.

The bank finally informed the parents, and the father prevented any more loans until his death in 1993. However, Konrad Aigner needed more and more money for new courses. Therefore, he gave notice at his civil service job and worked as an independent bus driver. "You'll see," he told his family, "now things are going to skyrocket for me very quickly. Money does not have anything to do with it." Konrad hardly slept any more. His brothers and sisters heard him running to and from his room until three or four o'clock in the morning. "He was under brutal pressure," recalled his brother. "Whenever the telephone rang, he would always come to a start. It was as if he was always being pursued. I was always sorry for him." Whenever anybody mentioned this to Konrad Aigner, he brushed them off; he did not want to talk about it.

The family often talked about it and came to the conclusion that Konrad was worried because of his financial independence. It was not until after his death that the degree of the financial damage was evident. The Aigners had to sell all their property holdings in order to pay off Konrad's debts. "We were only able to save the house." Anna, the 76 year old mother, works the day long in the beverage market in her house, "because otherwise we would not have enough money."

The state attorney's office had weighed pressing charges against both of the writers of the records with coercion and fraud, but the investigation had to be discontinued at the end of July: the statute of limitations had already run out. However, there is no doubt as to the authenticity of the records. In Scientology, according to the internal regulations of the business, these type of "knowledge reports" have to be submitted to the so-called "ethics officer" if a Scientologist finds himself in a "non-optimal situation." The person being written up receives a copy and is invited to express his opinion. What can that prove before the court? After all, Konrad Aigner is the one who signed his own credit application.

It is your own fault if you let somebody rip you off - with that attitude, says Jurgen Keltsche, more people such as Aigner are sentenced to be victims. The long-term district attorney and judge is qualified as ministerial counsel to the Bavarian Ministry of the Interior and as a member of the sects Enquete Commission for Scientology. "The Scientologists assimilate you into their system as in obedience training. The point of it is that they deprive you of your internal control and your will." That has nothing to do with belief or religion. "The difference between a religious community and Scientology is that in Scientology you will be methodically drilled on the basis of modern, pedagogical fundamentals. Your will power becomes restricted. Anybody who knows how these techniques work can quite easily defend himself. If you do not, sit tight." Keltsche talks about "psychology as a weapon," applicable in Hubbard's sense, "make money, make more money." "You can produce euphoria in a person using certain psychological techniques. In that moment they take people to the bank so they can borrow more money for the next course. I think that is unethical."

3. "Clears do not get colds."
L. RON HUBBARD

There was an open argument between Konrad and his family a single time. On April 2, 1997, there was a broadcast on television about the mysterious deaths of seven Scientologists. The case of the 36-year-old Lisa McPherson from Florida, who also had wanted to leave the organization, was described. After several peculiar episodes, one of which was a traffic accident, McPherson fell into a coma and died. The cause of death was listed as a bacterial infection. The American police were investigating as to whether Scientology was giving the young woman high doses of vitamin preparations instead of effective medication - high enough doses which, if taken over a long period of time without medical supervision, could have caused internal organ damage. Konrad Aigner did not want to sit through the entire broadcast; he angrily left the room saying, "How good they can act!"

On Thursday, July 17, 1997, Konrad Aigner received a call sometime after 9 p.m. "Yes, yes, that's clear, I'll come immediately." With beads of sweat on his forehead, he packed his things, and shortly before midnight he and his bus were on their way to Munich, said his brother. At that point, he had a slight cold, but was otherwise, in the opinion of his family, healthy. On Sunday, a colleague reached him on the bus telephone. Aigner sounded as if he could not stand up or talk straight, is what the man recalls. "All out," is all Aigner said, "I can not explain to you, all out."

On the same day, he caused an accident with his bus. Whether that was before or after the phone call could not be determined afterwards. On Monday he was supposed to drive several Scientologists to Frankfurt for a demonstration "for religious freedom." On Sunday evening, accompanied by two other Scientologists, he hectically rented two new busses. The car rental agent was the last non-Scientologist to see Konrad Aigner before his collapse. He said that Konrad had appeared as though he was under pressure, "He was cut and dried."

There was another traffic accident with one of the rented busses, which was driven by a 19 year old. After that, a room waiter in a hotel in Frankfurt allegedly noticed that Konrad was not at all doing well. Nevertheless, the Scientologists later drove together with him back to Munich. Neither Konrad's condition nor who drove the vehicles is clear - the Scientologists refused to give details. Around ten o'clock at night, Aigner collapsed in the Scientology center. "No acute event," noted the emergency doctor who had to report the collapse in the final days.

For Bernhard Aigner, Scientology is responsible for the death of his brother, "help was called too late, after nothing more could have been done. That is why I am going after them, because they let the whole weekend go by. If they noticed on Sunday morning that he was not doing well, then he needed help - help from a doctor, not from Scientology. If he had not been with them, he could have still been alive."

Konrad Aigner no longer had any medical insurance. He believed that Scientology could protect him from illness. In his most sold book, "Dianetics," (first edition 1950), Hubbard promised his adherents that arthritis, allergies, ulcers and a long list of other complaints would be "healed without exception" "with the help of Dianetic therapy", which means Scientology teachings. It alleged "a fact proved by research: clears do not get colds."

As a rule, the "therapy" consists of expensive counseling, vitamins, and going into the sauna for four to eight hours at a stretch. In Konrad's belongings, the state attorney's office found not only the records and invoices, but also boxes of high dosages of vitamin preparations, addresses of Scientology drug stores, and pages of instructions for the so-called "purification rundown," which is supposed to detoxify body and spirit. It states that after one hour of jogging, "spend about 4 hrs. in the sauna, during which time the heat is gradually increased. (...) (There) are salt tablets and also potassium available, if necessary, in case one detects physical difficulties such as faintness or nausea in the sauna."

In the weeks following, Bernhard Aigner repeatedly drove down to see the Munich Scientologists. "If nothing else, those were the people who had been together with Konrad during his last days. I wanted to know what had happened on that weekend, but I never got any information."

Scientology denies any responsibility. Never, asserted Johann Altendorfer, press representative of the organization, had anyone "advised Konrad to buy or consume pills or other preparations." In order to legally insure themselves, Scientology has their members sign a form before undergoing the torture of the purification rundown. As though Hubbard had never given his promise of eternal health, it states on the form, "I understand that Scientology is not intended to handle or cure physical illnesses. I and my heirs hereby renounce and abandon forever all foreseeable and non-foreseeable claims and specifications, actions, demands, rights, damages, injustices, expenses and losses against persons or owners of Scientology.


German officials bring heavy artillery to bear upon Scientology

Office of Constitutional Protection, "Hotline" and "Scientology-ToeV"
German officials bring heavy artillery to bear upon Scientology
Critics doubt their effectiveness

by Boris Reitschuster

Munich, June 19, 1998 (AFP) - For the one is it a "witch hunt," for the other is it an effective battle against a dangerous sect. In the dispute with the Scientology organization, the German officials are bringing their heavy artillery to bear. The Office of Constitutional Protection has the organization under surveillance. In Bavaria there is a "Scientology-ToeV" for which civil officials and the labor office must denote businesses connected with the organization by placing an "S" next to their position announcements. Scientology sees this as "discrimination," and critics doubt that this strict procedure is effective. Bavaria's Secretary of the Interior, however, believes the hard line has been effective. Last Friday, the Bundestag's Enquete Commission also mentioned that Scientology should continue to be observed by the Office of Constitutional Protection.

Scientology itself describes this as a "campaign of instigation" and a regular persecution of its own members. The organization criticizes the German officials by saying that they are proceeding against Scientology with "alarmist methods." Of all the German states, the "Free State" [of Bavaria] has taken the hardest line. Critics believe that Bavaria is using the wrong means. The Greens gripe that the secret service is not the right way to conduct the battle against Scientology. They believe that if members of the organization are violating rights in Germany, then an agency to handle rights violations should be put in place, and not the Office of Constitutional Protection.

Bavaria's Secretary of the Interior states that the surveillance by the Constitutional Protection agents has been effective. The authorities have now finally gotten exact findings about the structure of Scientology. More Scientology members now have the courage to leave [the organization] because of the office's "information offensive" and reports, says Christoph Hillenbrand, speaker for the Ministry of Interior. "previously one could write off the whole thing as lies. Thanks to the surveillance we know how fatal the [Scientology] system is."

The effectiveness of the measures taken by the authorities have even shown up in the top management of the organization, reports Hillenbrand. For instance, the income for Scientology has fallen in Germany, which promptly led to the recall of the former [Scientology] chief back to the USA. For these reasons the intervention of the authorities are "not overdone," but "appropriate," says Hillenbrand. Scientology itself stands clear: "They blow a lot of hot air about our measures, but they have not lodged a complaint against them, even though we would like to see a deciding judgment. They fear an independent judicial decision as the devil fears holy water."

The Free State has been making headlines with its regular "Scientology-ToeV" for officials: recruits and some long-term officials are being asked about their membership. "It has to do with the avoidance of conflict of interests," says Hillenbrand. He has not yet heard of a case in which a job applicant has been turned down because of membership in Scientology. Nevertheless, critics call this a constitutionally objectionable job prohibition. Other German states, such as Baden-Wurttemberg, also do not value "Scientology-ToeV." The Stuttgart Interior Ministry states that it would prefer to make a decision after the results of the Constitutional Protection surveillance are known.

Berlin is also making headlines in matters of "Scientology-ToeV." A police director there was relieved of duties because he is said to be a Scientology member - according to a anonymous letter. The police director contests the allegations. The Office of Constitutional Protection had bad luck with their investigation. According to press reports, an official is said to have paid a Scientologist 5,000 marks for "new findings" in the case. He is not likely to get anything for his money, as the man he paid has informed Scientology headquarters about the recruitment attempt.

brr/jes

The politician was giving a speech. One of the listeners commented, "Yesterday be was better!"
"But yesterday he didn't talk at all!"
"Yep."


Beckstein accuses Scientology of using Secret Police (Stasi) Methods

From: "Yahoo Schlagzeilen" June 4, 1998, 14:11

"Involuntary Hypnosis possible" - Psychology used as weapon - Telephone terrorism against critics

Munich (AP) According to new information gathered by the Bavarian Ministry of the Interior, the Scientology organization terrorizes critics by using wartime psychology methods, as had been previously used by the former secret police (Stasi). Besides that, the sect uses hypnotic techniques with which people can be involuntarily, ideologically manipulated. On Thursday, Secretary of the Interior Gunther Beckstein told reporters in Munich that Scientology has created a secret service which uses "the dirtiest methods" of psychology as a weapon. The similarities to the battle psychology of the former East German State Security Service are overwhelming.

In addition, the CSU politician [Beckstein] reported on terroristic measures being taken against Scientology critics, primarily in the USA. It is feared that the former chief of Scientology Hamburg at the time was called to account in America, and had to count on being tormented or receiving her "marching orders to the prison camp." "There are grounds for concern," said Beckstein. A newspaper editor in Germany, of the "Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung" also received serious threats after writing a report critical of Scientology. Beckstein reported of intimidation using telephone terrorism, murder threats, and the killing of house pets.

The measures taken by the state have met with great success, so that the organization has been more careful when it comes to committing punishable offenses in Germany. Nevertheless, Scientology still has the "goal of seizing power" and world domination. The system approves and orders punishable acts. According to what Beckstein says, there are "clear signs that the Scientology organization wants to do away with the democratic legal system entirely."

Doctor describes hypnotic techniques

The leading head physician of the Erlangen District Hospital, Gert Tauber, told about his experiences with Scientology victims. According to him, the sect has the potential of using hypnotic techniques even on critics against their will "to transform their perceptions.". The victim is placed in a condition in which they have full consciousness, but can be uncritically influenced. For instance, a person can be brought to feel no more sympathy. He is not familiar with any comparable perfected system of misuse in therapeutic psychology. The doctor also reported on deep psychological disturbances and "displacement depression" up to the point of nervous breakdown in former members.

The Bavarian Secretary of the Interior distributed two brochures which have information about the constitutional hostility and the system of the organization. Besides that, a victims advisory board will be established next month, where former members and their relatives can seek help.

Beckstein confirmed that a Scientology member was working in the Bavarian Ministry of Culture as a senior consultant. He is working in an area in which he could not be politically or ideologically active. A speaker for the Ministry of Culture stated that it was a mid-level official with 20 years of service, and that he "would never hurt a fly."

(From the editors: The brochures, "The Scientology System" and "Scientology - a constitutionally hostile effort" are available from the Ministry. On the internet, the brochures are available in full text [in German] at http://www.innenministerium.bayern.de/scientology.)


FOCUS: Bavaria intensifies the fight against Scientology

May 25, 1998

Munich. The Bavarian administration is intensifying its fight against Scientology. As reported by the news magazine FOCUS, the cabinet in Munich will permit the continuation of the extensive study of the psycho-sect: four professors are supposed to research the methods of Scientology and their effects upon people up through the end of the year. The experts should, among other things, state whether "illicit exploitation of the practice of healing" can be substantiated against the sect, and along with that, an offense of the medical laws. It will also be researched as to whether the Scientology methods stand in conflict to "the image of mankind and ethical claims of basic law." If this were the case, the sect could be prohibited as constitutionally hostile.

In any case the Bavarian cabinet will give the go ahead for a governmental "starting point from which advice to victims of Scientology" can be given. A sect expert and a psychologist will advise those harmed, relatives of victims and concerned parents and direct them to the appropriate assistance. Until now, only Hamburg had a state Scientology commissioner.


Beckstein: Scientology wants to bring the German Republic under its control

Munich, March 20, 1998 (AFP) - According to the interpretation of the Bavarian Provincial government, the Scientology organization pursues the goal of bringing the German Republic and other nations worldwide "under their influence." Scientology wants to establish a system of rights in which all of its own members are to be recognized as citizens, explained Secretary of the Interior Gunther Beckstein (CSU) on Friday in Munich at the presentation of the Bavarian Constitutional Protection report. Democracy and the multi-party system are to be removed, according to the plans of the organization.

According to Beckstein's statement, Germany has about 10,000 members. World-wide the German Scientology members do not reach a high rank in the internal hierarchy of the organization, stated the CSU politician. The command center for the German Scientologists is in England or Denmark. The Office of Constitutional Protection will continue to "remain an important means in the discussion of this organization", announced Beckstein. The measures in Germany against Scientology are, according to the interpretation of the UNO, not a transgression against rights nor against the order of tolerance.

Scientology regards itself as a religious society, but is categorized in Germany as a commercial enterprize with totalitarian goals.


Death of a Scientologist

Studio Time: From Religion and Society
March 11, 1998
DLF
A Broadcast by Claudia Sanders
Length: 19 minutes

Narrator:

Scientology: The controversial organization has been leaning increasingly toward politics in the past few years. The psycho-group has been under surveillance by the Office of Constitutional Protection since the summer of 1997. Some think this to have been an overreaction on the part of the State, others would rather ban Scientology, because the group, to them, appears to be dangerous. In this discussion it is easy to lose sight of the future of Scientology victims. According to the statement of the organization there are about 30,000 members in Germany. In the past year, one of these members died, Konrad A., under mysterious circumstances. The Munich Chief District Attorney's office is now investigating. In response, Scientology refuses any responsibility for the death of the man, and is designated by the the police investigation as a "malevolent third party under suspicion." Hear the story of the death of Konrad A. from his brother's side. "Deadly Career - in the Clutches of Scientology": a broadcast by Claudia Sanders

1. VOICEOVER: In a car.

Narrator: A two hour drive from Munich. The farm house lies somewhat off the road. In the front garden, across from the front door, stands a small devotional picture, with red roses, and candle, and a photo of Konrad. He died this past summer, after he lie in a coma for three weeks. The 43-year-old was a Scientologist. Today his family is still puzzled by the cause of Konrad's death, who outwardly appeared hale and hearty.

2. VOICEOVER: In a large City.

Narrator: (Cutback:)

Fall 1974. Konrad had just finished his military service, he lived in Munich and received training with the Department of Transportation. This is when he encountered Scientology. They promised him outright miracles if he would use the Scientology technology - called Dianetics. They referred their novice to the standard work of the Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard: "Dianetics - the Textbook for Human Understanding." That is where Konrad, then 20 years old, found the following, and more, about Dianetics:

3. VOICEOVER/Quotation

"It enables a plane of ability and rationality for people which is far over the average, and it does not destroy his life force or personality, but raises it."

Narrator:

Scientologists, according to the standard text of the organization, have at their disposal a higher degree of intelligence, become less sick, and they do not even catch colds. This is what Konrad believed. Even if he hardly spoke with his family about it. Perhaps he was aware, because of his strong Catholic environment, that it would have branded him as an outsider. Konrad's brother Bernd recalls:

4. VOICEOVER:

The topic of Scientology was always off-limits with us. One knew full well that he had contact with Scientology, but that was not a topic of discussion with us. He had not brought up the subject spontaneously, therefore he had tried neither to bring one of us into SC nor to recruit for SC, nor had he expressed himself about SC in any way, there was nothing like that.

Narrator.

It is really unusual that a Scientology member not recruit for the organization. Even if Konrad himself had no interest in recruiting his family, he would still have been under pressure to take as many courses and buy as many books as possible. He had given Scientology almost all of his money:

5. VOICEOVER:

We found piles and sacks of bills, the so-called donations to SC, they were so scattered about, we could have bundled them together in a large bag, that's how many there were. And books, all the books there were, and other documents, everything that could have had to do with SC, there you found it, in the room where Konrad lived.

Narrator:

In spite of his long-term membership, Konrad's career as a Scientologist did not run a smooth course: as soon as he would reach his Scientology course goal, he would find out that he would have to start all over again, and would have to take more expensive courses. Naturally all of this was done with the promise that one was only trying to help him to lead a successful life.

Finally Konrad made what was to be for him a fateful decision: He had a lifetime position; he worked as a bus driver. He gave it up: be became an independent bus driver - Scientology would help him with that:

6. VOICEOVER:

He made himself independent, so around 3 years ago and for the past 2 years his personality was very, very much changed. He had always been the life of the party, he was eager, was very open, the last 2 years he became visibly more thoughtful, more depressive, absent. We all thought that had to do with his self-employment, but in hindsight I see it differently now. He had other problems.

Narrator:

In particular, financial problems. Because in order to make more money for Scientology, Konrad did not hesitate to take out loans, even on his parents' house. His mother signed the contract, she believed her son, that he would pay everything back -- an investment in the future. That was the point of Scientology's discussion with the family.

In Spring, 1997, a news story appeared on television about the mysterious death of an American Scientologist, Lisa McPherson. Apparently she wished to leave the organization before she got into an accident with her car. Then she came into the headquarters of Scientology, in Clearwater, Florida. She remained there for 17 days, until she was delivered dead to a hospital. The autopsy revealed that the 36-year-old was heavily de-hydrated and had lain in a coma for days before her death. The Scientologists had prescribed high doses of vitamins for her. Konrad's reaction to this show:

7. VOICEOVER

While the show was running, my mother said to him, look at that, what kind of thing is going on there, and he was terribly amused, he laughed. He only laughed and said that what the media was doing was a horrible injustice, nothing like that had happened, it was all made up in order to do away with SC, the people are all actors, the whole thing is made up, and I haven't seen a funnier show in a long time. That's how he reacted.

Narrator:

Konrad did not realize that his death would prove to be parallel to that of the American.

Several weeks later, it was July 17, 1997:

8. VOICEOVER:

That was on Thursday evening about 9 o'clock, I would guess, or 9:30, when the call came, Konrad was lying on the couch here, then he got the call, there were three or four of us. Here on the table is where he took the call, and you could tell right away that that was a call which deeply affected him. He got shaky right away, started sweating, he was very nervous and he used sentence fragments, he couldn't even speak right, that's how nervous he was, and, in closing, he said, "yes is good, I'll do that," or "yes I'm coming", I don't know any more. He then hung up, packed his things and a half hour later he drove away with the bus and we could tell by the sound of his engine that he was headed for Munich.

Narrator:

How Konrad spent the last days of his life has not been fully explained. Bernd had found out that his brother apparently received the assignment to drive Scientologists to Frankfurt am Main. They demonstrated there on July 21 for "religious freedom" and against the "suppression of Scientology" in Germany. On the way there, but still in Munich, Konrad got into an accident with his bus - a moving violation - as the police reported. No mention was made in the report, according to Bernd, of his brother being hurt. Konrad left the bus there and several Scientologists drove with their own cars to Frankfurt. Konrad rented a car, which again, -- sometime later -- was involved in a slight accident. The driver was not Konrad, but a woman, apparently also a Scientologist. The trip continued nevertheless, at least that is apparently what a Scientologist told Konrad's brother later on. Arriving at a Frankfurt hotel, a waiter allegedly noticed that Konrad was not doing well. The 43-year-old is said to have then been brought to Munich.

9. VOICEOVER:

The emergency doctor was notified about 10:30 at night, he drive down Bergstrasse, since that is the location of SC and the emergency doctor had then said, when I talked with him later, a couple of days later, he had said, that my brother was hardly breathing when he arrived, he was with the Scientologists, be was barely still breathing, he had to resuscitate him immediately, brought him to the hospital which was two kilometers [about a mile and a quarter] away, the Scientologists drove with him and went with him into the hospital where he then fell into a coma towards one o'clock in the morning. And stayed in a coma for three weeks and never woke up again.

Narrator:

The doctors were faced with a dilemma - no therapy could be recommended for the patient.

10. VOICEOVER

The course of the illness, such as the story in the hospital, was very atypical as far as the doctors were concerned, so they recommended or asked us, that my brother should have an autopsy, and we agreed, because we were also of the opinion, from the start, that something about the matter had not gone properly... It was determined at the autopsy, that Konrad had very, very poor organs.

Narrator:

Bernd researched some more on his own -- he wanted to know what role Scientology had played in the death of his brother. Not least of all, he tried to understand what had so fascinated his brother about this organization -- which is described by critics as a "cartel which despises people."

11. VOICEOVER:

I drove there in anger, constant anger, because I knew that there was something which the Scientologists knew that they would not tell me about my brother's last hours or days. They appeased my anger, showed sympathy, sympathy which I never see today, where this sympathy came from, that was very unique at the time. I was down there four, five times to find something out, information about my brother, but I basically learned nothing concrete.

Besides the documents and books which Bernd found in the room of his dead brother, there is little else left over. Bills indicate that Konrad had been taking mega-doses of vitamin preparations for years. Scientologists are supposed to take vitamins when they receive auditing. This auditing is a procedure invented by Scientology. The adherents are supposed to be freed from psychic problems by a constant stream of questions and answers. The Federal Criminal Investigation Office (BKA) has been describing this auditing as brainwashing since the Seventies.

Scientologists also take vitamins when they undergo a purification process -- a so-called "rundown." A rundown is necessary, according to Scientology text, if someone has taken drugs. The use of drugs is prohibited in Scientology. However, for Scientologists, not only alcohol and other narcotics, but also medication -- even aspirin -- is viewed as a drug. How many of these "cures" Konrad had undergone is still unclear. It is also not clear what effects come about when someone takes high doses of vitamins for years at a time. It is known that a long-term overdose of certain vitamins can cause serious internal organ damage. How much this explains the fact that Konrad's organs were in such poor shape is uncertain.

What is certain is that Konrad believed that Scientology-Dianetics technology could prevent illnesses. It was for this reason that he, as a self-employed person, did without health insurance. How much Scientologists trust the Dianetic ability to heal is contained in the so-called "Book Zero", the first Dianetic writing of the Scientology founder:

12. VOICEOVER/Quotation

Arthritis, dermatitis, allergies, asthma, some heart complaints, eye trouble, sinusitis, ulcers, etc. are just a small sample of the list of psychosomatic illnesses. Peculiar aches and pains, which appear in various parts of the body, are generally of a psychosomatic nature. Migraine is a psychosomatic illness and can, as can all the others, be healed with the help of Dianetic therapy, without exception (and healed in the fullest sense of the word.)

Narrator:

Healing with Dianetics? That and Konrad's death have reached the ears of the Munich State Prosecutor. Is Scientology practicing some kind of treatment that only doctors should be using? This would be a violation of the law against quack doctors. Does this include treatments with vitamin preparations that could cause long-term health problems?

Over a month ago, more than 100 police swept through the Munich Scientology buildings. They confiscated documents by the box full; the information which comes from that is supposed to disclose what actually happened to Konrad before his death. It has not yet been determined whether the district attorney will press charges against Scientologists. It may be weeks before the documents are all appraised. In the meantime, Konrad's family tries to find their way back to a normal life, though that will not be easy for them:

13. VOICEOVER.

Today letters and newspapers from Scientologists arrive daily, letters personally written, such as, "Hello Konrad! How are you doing?" In closing, the letters offer, this week, to sell 6 books by Ron, etc. Mail constantly arrives as if nothing had ever happened. Mail arrives as if he were still alive.

Narrator:

Bernd and his family must pay dearly for the Scientology membership of their brother. Moreover:

14. VOICEOVER.

We had already noticed, before the estate settlement, that we would have to assume a huge debt, the debt to the bank was so large and so high, that we had to sell the land, the farm and the woods, we had to sell it all to settle the debt with the bank (and this mountain of debt is, according to our research, all a result of nothing else but Scientology.)

Narrator:

What has been left to the family is their parents' home only. Bernd estimates that his brother must have given at least 600,000 marks [about $430,000] to Scientology. Add to that the hospital bills of 40,000 marks, which must still be paid.

The family is financially ruined, but much worse are the doubts: why was Konrad with Scientology? Could the family have saved him? Could anyone, after 23 years, have freed Konrad from the clutches of the organization? These are questions which remain unanswered for Konrad's family.

As said, the story of Konrad is a subjective story. And not the half of it is that Scientology denies any responsibility for Konrad's death. Police investigation designates the organization as a "malicious third party under suspicion."


Death of a Scientologist

Studio Time: From Religion and Society
March 11, 1998
DLF
A Broadcast by Claudia Sanders
Length: 19 minutes

Narrator:

Scientology: The controversial organization has been leaning increasingly toward politics in the past few years. The psycho-group has been under surveillance by the Office of Constitutional Protection since the summer of 1997. Some think this to have been an overreaction on the part of the State, others would rather ban Scientology, because the group, to them, appears to be dangerous. In this discussion it is easy to lose sight of the future of Scientology victims. According to the statement of the organization there are about 30,000 members in Germany. In the past year, one of these members died, Konrad A., under mysterious circumstances. The Munich Chief District Attorney's office is now investigating. In response, Scientology refuses any responsibility for the death of the man, and is designated by the the police investigation as a "malevolent third party under suspicion." Hear the story of the death of Konrad A. from his brother's side. "Deadly Career - in the Clutches of Scientology": a broadcast by Claudia Sanders

1. VOICEOVER: In a car.

Narrator: A two hour drive from Munich. The farm house lies somewhat off the road. In the front garden, across from the front door, stands a small devotional picture, with red roses, and candle, and a photo of Konrad. He died this past summer, after he lie in a coma for three weeks. The 43-year-old was a Scientologist. Today his family is still puzzled by the cause of Konrad's death, who outwardly appeared hale and hearty.

2. VOICEOVER: In a large City.

Narrator: (Cutback:)

Fall 1974. Konrad had just finished his military service, he lived in Munich and received training with the Department of Transportation. This is when he encountered Scientology. They promised him outright miracles if he would use the Scientology technology - called Dianetics. They referred their novice to the standard work of the Scientology founder, L. Ron Hubbard: "Dianetics - the Textbook for Human Understanding." That is where Konrad, then 20 years old, found the following, and more, about Dianetics:

3. VOICEOVER/Quotation

"It enables a plane of ability and rationality for people which is far over the average, and it does not destroy his life force or personality, but raises it."

Narrator:

Scientologists, according to the standard text of the organization, have at their disposal a higher degree of intelligence, become less sick, and they do not even catch colds. This is what Konrad believed. Even if he hardly spoke with his family about it. Perhaps he was aware, because of his strong Catholic environment, that it would have branded him as an outsider. Konrad's brother Bernd recalls:

4. VOICEOVER:

The topic of Scientology was always off-limits with us. One knew full well that he had contact with Scientology, but that was not a topic of discussion with us. He had not brought up the subject spontaneously, therefore he had tried neither to bring one of us into SC nor to recruit for SC, nor had he expressed himself about SC in any way, there was nothing like that.

Narrator.

It is really unusual that a Scientology member not recruit for the organization. Even if Konrad himself had no interest in recruiting his family, he would still have been under pressure to take as many courses and buy as many books as possible. He had given Scientology almost all of his money:

5. VOICEOVER:

We found piles and sacks of bills, the so-called donations to SC, they were so scattered about, we could have bundled them together in a large bag, that's how many there were. And books, all the books there were, and other documents, everything that could have had to do with SC, there you found it, in the room where Konrad lived.

Narrator:

In spite of his long-term membership, Konrad's career as a Scientologist did not run a smooth course: as soon as he would reach his Scientology course goal, he would find out that he would have to start all over again, and would have to take more expensive courses. Naturally all of this was done with the promise that one was only trying to help him to lead a successful life.

Finally Konrad made what was to be for him a fateful decision: He had a lifetime position; he worked as a bus driver. He gave it up: be became an independent bus driver - Scientology would help him with that:

6. VOICEOVER:

He made himself independent, so around 3 years ago and for the past 2 years his personality was very, very much changed. He had always been the life of the party, he was eager, was very open, the last 2 years he became visibly more thoughtful, more depressive, absent. We all thought that had to do with his self-employment, but in hindsight I see it differently now. He had other problems.

Narrator:

In particular, financial problems. Because in order to make more money for Scientology, Konrad did not hesitate to take out loans, even on his parents' house. His mother signed the contract, she believed her son, that he would pay everything back -- an investment in the future. That was the point of Scientology's discussion with the family.

In Spring, 1997, a news story appeared on television about the mysterious death of an American Scientologist, Lisa McPherson. Apparently she wished to leave the organization before she got into an accident with her car. Then she came into the headquarters of Scientology, in Clearwater, Florida. She remained there for 17 days, until she was delivered dead to a hospital. The autopsy revealed that the 36-year-old was heavily de-hydrated and had lain in a coma for days before her death. The Scientologists had prescribed high doses of vitamins for her. Konrad's reaction to this show:

7. VOICEOVER

While the show was running, my mother said to him, look at that, what kind of thing is going on there, and he was terribly amused, he laughed. He only laughed and said that what the media was doing was a horrible injustice, nothing like that had happened, it was all made up in order to do away with SC, the people are all actors, the whole thing is made up, and I haven't seen a funnier show in a long time. That's how he reacted.

Narrator:

Konrad did not realize that his death would prove to be parallel to that of the American.

Several weeks later, it was July 17, 1997:

8. VOICEOVER:

That was on Thursday evening about 9 o'clock, I would guess, or 9:30, when the call came, Konrad was lying on the couch here, then he got the call, there were three or four of us. Here on the table is where he took the call, and you could tell right away that that was a call which deeply affected him. He got shaky right away, started sweating, he was very nervous and he used sentence fragments, he couldn't even speak right, that's how nervous he was, and, in closing, he said, "yes is good, I'll do that," or "yes I'm coming", I don't know any more. He then hung up, packed his things and a half hour later he drove away with the bus and we could tell by the sound of his engine that he was headed for Munich.

Narrator:

How Konrad spent the last days of his life has not been fully explained. Bernd had found out that his brother apparently received the assignment to drive Scientologists to Frankfurt am Main. They demonstrated there on July 21 for "religious freedom" and against the "suppression of Scientology" in Germany. On the way there, but still in Munich, Konrad got into an accident with his bus - a moving violation - as the police reported. No mention was made in the report, according to Bernd, of his brother being hurt. Konrad left the bus there and several Scientologists drove with their own cars to Frankfurt. Konrad rented a car, which again, -- sometime later -- was involved in a slight accident. The driver was not Konrad, but a woman, apparently also a Scientologist. The trip continued nevertheless, at least that is apparently what a Scientologist told Konrad's brother later on. Arriving at a Frankfurt hotel, a waiter allegedly noticed that Konrad was not doing well. The 43-year-old is said to have then been brought to Munich.

9. VOICEOVER:

The emergency doctor was notified about 10:30 at night, he drive down Bergstrasse, since that is the location of SC and the emergency doctor had then said, when I talked with him later, a couple of days later, he had said, that my brother was hardly breathing when he arrived, he was with the Scientologists, be was barely still breathing, he had to resuscitate him immediately, brought him to the hospital which was two kilometers [about a mile and a quarter] away, the Scientologists drove with him and went with him into the hospital where he then fell into a coma towards one o'clock in the morning. And stayed in a coma for three weeks and never woke up again.

Narrator:

The doctors were faced with a dilemma - no therapy could be recommended for the patient.

10. VOICEOVER

The course of the illness, such as the story in the hospital, was very atypical as far as the doctors were concerned, so they recommended or asked us, that my brother should have an autopsy, and we agreed, because we were also of the opinion, from the start, that something about the matter had not gone properly... It was determined at the autopsy, that Konrad had very, very poor organs.

Narrator:

Bernd researched some more on his own -- he wanted to know what role Scientology had played in the death of his brother. Not least of all, he tried to understand what had so fascinated his brother about this organization -- which is described by critics as a "cartel which despises people."

11. VOICEOVER:

I drove there in anger, constant anger, because I knew that there was something which the Scientologists knew that they would not tell me about my brother's last hours or days. They appeased my anger, showed sympathy, sympathy which I never see today, where this sympathy came from, that was very unique at the time. I was down there four, five times to find something out, information about my brother, but I basically learned nothing concrete.

Besides the documents and books which Bernd found in the room of his dead brother, there is little else left over. Bills indicate that Konrad had been taking mega-doses of vitamin preparations for years. Scientologists are supposed to take vitamins when they receive auditing. This auditing is a procedure invented by Scientology. The adherents are supposed to be freed from psychic problems by a constant stream of questions and answers. The Federal Criminal Investigation Office (BKA) has been describing this auditing as brainwashing since the Seventies.

Scientologists also take vitamins when they undergo a purification process -- a so-called "rundown." A rundown is necessary, according to Scientology text, if someone has taken drugs. The use of drugs is prohibited in Scientology. However, for Scientologists, not only alcohol and other narcotics, but also medication -- even aspirin -- is viewed as a drug. How many of these "cures" Konrad had undergone is still unclear. It is also not clear what effects come about when someone takes high doses of vitamins for years at a time. It is known that a long-term overdose of certain vitamins can cause serious internal organ damage. How much this explains the fact that Konrad's organs were in such poor shape is uncertain.

What is certain is that Konrad believed that Scientology-Dianetics technology could prevent illnesses. It was for this reason that he, as a self-employed person, did without health insurance. How much Scientologists trust the Dianetic ability to heal is contained in the so-called "Book Zero", the first Dianetic writing of the Scientology founder:

12. VOICEOVER/Quotation

Arthritis, dermatitis, allergies, asthma, some heart complaints, eye trouble, sinusitis, ulcers, etc. are just a small sample of the list of psychosomatic illnesses. Peculiar aches and pains, which appear in various parts of the body, are generally of a psychosomatic nature. Migraine is a psychosomatic illness and can, as can all the others, be healed with the help of Dianetic therapy, without exception (and healed in the fullest sense of the word.)

Narrator:

Healing with Dianetics? That and Konrad's death have reached the ears of the Munich State Prosecutor. Is Scientology practicing some kind of treatment that only doctors should be using? This would be a violation of the law against quack doctors. Does this include treatments with vitamin preparations that could cause long-term health problems?

Over a month ago, more than 100 police swept through the Munich Scientology buildings. They confiscated documents by the box full; the information which comes from that is supposed to disclose what actually happened to Konrad before his death. It has not yet been determined whether the district attorney will press charges against Scientologists. It may be weeks before the documents are all appraised. In the meantime, Konrad's family tries to find their way back to a normal life, though that will not be easy for them:

13. VOICEOVER.

Today letters and newspapers from Scientologists arrive daily, letters personally written, such as, "Hello Konrad! How are you doing?" In closing, the letters offer, this week, to sell 6 books by Ron, etc. Mail constantly arrives as if nothing had ever happened. Mail arrives as if he were still alive.

Narrator:

Bernd and his family must pay dearly for the Scientology membership of their brother. Moreover:

14. VOICEOVER.

We had already noticed, before the estate settlement, that we would have to assume a huge debt, the debt to the bank was so large and so high, that we had to sell the land, the farm and the woods, we had to sell it all to settle the debt with the bank (and this mountain of debt is, according to our research, all a result of nothing else but Scientology.)

Narrator:

What has been left to the family is their parents' home only. Bernd estimates that his brother must have given at least 600,000 marks [about $430,000] to Scientology. Add to that the hospital bills of 40,000 marks, which must still be paid.

The family is financially ruined, but much worse are the doubts: why was Konrad with Scientology? Could the family have saved him? Could anyone, after 23 years, have freed Konrad from the clutches of the organization? These are questions which remain unanswered for Konrad's family.

As said, the story of Konrad is a subjective story. And not the half of it is that Scientology denies any responsibility for Konrad's death. Police investigation designates the organization as a "malicious third party under suspicion."


Very clear words from Bavaria

from http://www.main-rheiner.de/und_die_welt/objekt.phtml?artikel_id=85000

Cultural Secretary Beckstein in "Scientology Tribunal"/Help for Cult Victims
March 9 ,1998

The Secretary of Culture from Bavaria becomes very clear when he speaks about Scientology. This organization operates "on the fringes of organized criminality," says Dr. Gunther Beckstein; he calls their so-called "Rehabilitation Camps", which are supposed to put disloyal members back on course, "similar to concentration camps." The word "brainwashing" is used [by him] in the same way. The field of psychological and social technology must be regulated by statute, demands Beckstein. The reason for this is that a person who is seeking help from the chief providers of professional help is not able to differentiate whether he is dealing with an expert or if he has fallen into the hands of an organization such as Scientology.

At a fully packed hall of the Nibelung Hotel, in the third "Scientology Tribunal", the Youth Union (YU) wanted to know how to deal with Scientology. For this reason they had invited the Bavarian Secretary of Culture, because he is a front runner in this area in the Free State. In return Beckstein praised the YU, which has already been taking note of the dangers of Scientology since 1993. The theme would have arisen from his politics if it had not first arisen from his engagement, admitted Beckstein. The CSU man could not resist a side trip through the SPD-ruled Rheinland-Pfalz, where he spent somewhat more time.

For everyone there, Beckstein described how the procedure works in Bavaria. Applicants for the civil service are asked if they belong to Scientology or if they take their courses. In that way it can be determined if someone can work in a kindergarten, where stricter measures are required, or whether he works in a municipal lumberyard. An applicant is also questioned as to whether he is a practitioner or an victim of Scientology, said Beckstein. Companies which receive public contracts must declare that they have nothing to do with Scientology. It will also be determined at this point whether it is a computer firm which serves the network system of the state criminal investigation office, therefore an extremely sensitive area, or a messenger for the police reserves. Not a fictitious example, says Beckstein - the last happened in reality. A messenger had stated that he belonged to Scientology, but got his civil service commission because he would have passed up a favorable offer and could have done no harm to speak of.

He puts much worth on the help of those willing to leave the cult. An anonymous help line was so busy that there weren't enough people to man the lines. Combing the Scientology center in Munich and the evaluations thereof had sometimes resulted in descriptions from cult departees which sounded unbelievable, but which corresponded with reality. Among other things they were actually pursued with posters [pickets].

In the Fall the first results of the nation-wide (with the exception of Schleswig-Holstein) surveillance of Scientology will be made available by the Office for Constitutional Protection. Beckstein is sure that it will make clear that Scientology must continue to be observed as a dangerous organization.


Secretary Beckstein on Scientology Brainwashing

[From the German Bavarian Web Page]

March 7, 1998

Beckstein: "Human science research of the psychological and social techniques of Scientology will expose these to be brainwashing"

"The Scientology organization is not a religion, instead it misuses known religious concepts in order to execute their scrupulous implantation of psychological and social technology and the ruthless exploitation of people", said Dr. Gunther Beckstein, Secretary of Culture, at a convention in Worms. The determination of the Bavarian state administration of Scientology as a basically criminalistic system has been fully confirmed by the visit of the Enquete Commission's So-Called Sects and Psycho-groups to the USA. The decree of the 15-point list of measures of the Bavarian administration to prevent the expansion of this totalitarian system which despises human rights was therefore correct and necessary, declared Beckstein.

The Secretary thought particularly important a statutory arrangement in the area of commercial life assistance for the protection of consumers from non-professional providers in the new service market for life assistance and personality development. "The actual legal outline of Hamburg in the form worked up by the state council offers, from our point of view, an exemplary basis. The Commonwealth of Bavaria supports this initiative and hopes for a settlement as soon as possible," said Beckstein.

The applied psychological and social technologies used by the Scientology system to trap and exploit people will soon be completely exposed as brainwashing by the research done by the Bavarian administration in institutional inter-disciplinary human science, said Beckstein conclusively.


Regensburger: "Green Schizophrenia in Matters of Scientology"

[From the German Bavarian Web Page]

March 6, 1998

State Secretary of Culture Hermann Regensburger described the conduct of the Green Party's federal representative, Angelika Koster-Lossack, as politically schizophrenic. She had described the Scientology organization, at the end of a trip to the USA of the Enquete's Commission's "so-called sects and psycho-groups", as a "politically extremist organization, whose danger has, until now, been underestimated." According to a press announcement which had just been released today, she is no longer convinced that the organization should be observed by the Office for Constitutional Protection and said that, in Germany, there need be no "discrimination against the organization." Regensburger: "This is an especially discouraging example of the political irresponsibility of the Greens. It also shows that factual arguments do not stop the Greens from representing ideologically stubborn positions. After the return from the USA Mrs. Koster-Lossack has apparently been nudged back into party lines. She had to give up her correct insights which she had gained as a result of first-hand information in favor of the old party line of downplaying Scientology."


Employers' Right to Question and
the Possibility of Termination of Employment

Labor Law vs. Scientology

Sueddeutsche Zeitung of February 14, 1998

Necessity for Protective Measures Grows / Few Verdicts up to now
by Andrea Nasemann

How can businesses protect themselves against Scientology? The magazine "Der Betrieb" ("Management") dedicates itself to this question in it's December edition (Volume 50 of 12/12/1997.) Jobst-Hubertus Bauer, an attorney specializing in labor law, together with two colleagues, gives an indication of how businesses which carry a responsibility for their own employees in accordance with labor laws are able to withstand the members of the Scientology Organizations, and how they are able to impede the enlistment of such workers.

The authors are not able to draw from many judicial decisions. Just that the Federal Labor Court determined in a verdict of March 22, 1995 that Scientology is neither a religious nor a philosophical association. The religious and philosophical teachings serve much more as a pretext for the pursuit of commercial goals (5 AZB 21/94). But what has not been determined is to what length employers may ask about Scientology membership in their recruitment efforts. Conclusive criteria for the admissibility of such a question is the relevance of the applicant's suitability for the workplace.

Questions concerning Scientology membership are permitted if the employment is of a nature which involves a position of trust, by "normal", not religious or politically directed. labor standards. This involves supervisors, deputies and other leading employees, as well as secretaries or bookkeepers. "Also workers who possess primary oversight over subordinate positions who are able to cull sensitive data from their area", warns Bauer.

Whoever wants to know information about his potential co-workers has to pay attention to the exact wording of his question, because the question "Are you a Scientologist" may be denied by its members. If you instead ask whether they apply the technology of L. Ron Hubbard or whether they are a member of the IAS (Internal Association of Scientologists), then they are obligated to tell the truth in accordance with the Scientology teachings. If an applicant falsely answers the question, the employer may challenge the work relationship based on intentional deceit. Result: the labor contract is invalid, the employment is over.

"The employer should write up an appropriate explanation in the labor contract concerning the completion of the application for employment, with the assurance of the employee that he is neither a Scientologist nor does he intend to enter this organization", advises Labor Attorney Bauer. A rule concerning breach of contract may also be worthy of consideration. In this case the exact wording must be carefully noted. "By this means he business can publicly document that it distances itself from the goals of Scientology", recommends Bauer.

However, whether the employer may ask a worker who is already employed about his membership in Scientology is not stated. The Federal Labor Court fundamentally affirmed that the employee had an obligation to give information if the employer had an "genuinely honest, proprietary and sanctioned interest in the answering of the question about the his work relationship, and the giving of the information would not place a presumptuous burden upon the employee" (Decision of September 7, 1995, 8AZR 828/93). The employer may nevertheless not ask this question for the purpose of terminating employment. The question is permitted only for the transfer of the employee to a different place of work, and in particular for promotion to a higher level which is inherently connected with a position of trust.

However, the termination of a worker's employment only because of his membership in Scientology is permissible only when it relates to a special position of trust. This was determined by the Berlin District Labor Court which effected the immediate dismissal of a psychologist who had children under her care (Decision of June 11, 1997, 13 Sa 19/97). Otherwise the simple fact of membership is not a grounds for dismissal, since it does not affect the suitability of an employee for his workplace. Whoever recruits for Scientology in the workplace or distributes its literature can be dismissed after one warning (Rheinland-Pfalz District Court, Judgment of July 12, 1995, 9 Sa 890/93). If these activities are conducted outside of working hours, a reason for dismissal exists only if work relations are adversely affected.


The Puzzling Death of Konrad Aigner

Passau New Press
February 14, 1998
by Gerhard Huber

8,000 marks for a few circuits and a multi-meter scale. Berhard Aigner lays the device back in the well-worn hard-cover case: an e-meter counseling device, basic equipment for Scientology members who use it for measuring spiritual energy. "That is the only thing in our house that still reminds us of Konrad's time with the sect. And we'll throw that away sometime, too", says Bernhard Aigner.

Konrad was one of six brothers and sisters who grew up with Bernhard Aigner in a small Rottal farm house in Weiler Rumannsaigen. The parents were farmers and increased their holdings in the course of time. The family is intact - a happy group and a tightly-knot society. In their open house hospitality means everything. Konrad was mostly the center of attention. "He was the life of the party. Always joking and good-natured before anything else", recalls Bernhard.

After lineman training with the railroad in Simbach/Inn and the ensuing service with the military Konrad Aigner left Rottal in 1976. He went to Munich and to a position as a bus driver with the Federal Transportation Department. That is where he made his first contact with Scientology. Bernhard Aigner: "A naive, trusting, inexperienced farmer's son, who had no idea of what the world is like - the ideal member."

Konrad Aigner's positions with the Transportation Department as well as his places of residence changed: Munich, Augsburg, Ulm. What remained were the regular visits home to Ruhmannsaigen - and his membership in Scientology. Konrad did not make any secret out of that. Brothers, sisters, parents, the entire family knew about it. Nevertheless hardly anything was ever said. "That was off limits", said Bernhard. Only once, as a report about the sect was broadcast over the TV, did the deceased brother react uncustomarily vehemently and defended the Scientology view. "Otherwise there was never any sort of attempt by Konrad to interest and to recruit one of us in the organization."

Three years ago Konrad Aigner unexpectedly moved back to the house of his birth. In the meantime his father had died. Konrad threw away his secure civil service job and became independently employed with a used bus. "That way I can earn a lot of money, so I can move up the Bridge as soon as possible", he told his mother Anna, today 76 years old. The "Bridge" - that means "salvation" for Scientologists.

Mardi Gras associations, theater groups, sports fans - the easy-going bus driver was loved by the entire community. At home the facade crumbled. "In the last two years Konrad changed. He was tense, nervous, thoughtful", said Bernhard. The family often spoke about it and came to the conclusion that it must have had to do with the worries that come with self-employment.

Only after Konrad's death in August, 1997 was the personal catastrophe apparent. The first time his brothers and sisters entered his room. Books, pamphlets, letters - Scientology documents everywhere. Bernhard said, "We had no idea that he was in it so deep."

Georg Stoffel, public relations agent for the "Scientology Kirche Deutschland" [Scientology Church of Germany] did not want to address the specific case. But said, "We have no support from taxes and also no membership fees, we live from the voluntary donations of members - and that can be connected to expenses." Konrad's joy of donating leaves the Aigners a bitter legacy: their parents' estate is laden with debt. His brothers and sisters who commonly share the inheritance have to sell the land. "We have lost everything. We could only save our parents' house - but that is still worth something to us", said Bernhard. The Aigners do not blame their brother. "He went through hell and could no longer make his own decisions. Scientology ruined his life - and ours." All brothers and sisters agree unanimously, "If he would not have been with this sect, he could still be alive."

The bachelor left behind a financial ruin. Forms showed that he had within the last few months given about 70,000 marks over to the organization. It must have been over 600,000 marks, estimates Barnhard Aigner, in the course of the years. "Konrad made good money and was very frugal. He never bought a new car, never went on vacation and had no hobbies. In spite of that he left only debts."

Witnesses testify that Konrad had often tried to throw off the chains of the sect. He poured his heart out to a doctor, with whom he had been friends for a long time, "I want to get out, because I've changed for the negative. I have finally seen through the group." The doctor offered his help. Months later Konrad showed up at his place for the last time, "Everything's all right, things are moving again." About one year ago he tearfully said to his mother, "Mom, I want to get away from them. I have learned something so terrible that if I were to tell you, you would fall dead on the spot." But Konrad stayed with them until the end. And of course his mysterious death bothers his family, "We'll never rest until everything is cleared up." The district attorney is also occupied with the case. Konrad Aigner died in August 1997 after being delivered to a Swabian hospital and after a three-week coma: multiple organ collapse - heart, lungs and stomach had simultaneously shut down. Neither did the autopsy bring an explanation. "For his age the man had unusually poor organs", reported Chief District Attorney Helmut Meier-Staude.

Vitamin pills from the Netherlands were found among Conrad Aigner's possessions. It is suspected that Scientologists encouraged him to take them. For that reason a charge against the pharmaceutical and medical laws will be pursued. Charges which have been rejected by Scientology. Bernhard remains determined, "They have not directly murdered my brother. But indirectly they are responsible for his death." Konrad Aigner did not even have hospitalization insurance - he believed that his religion would protect him from illness. The brother described Konrad Aigner's last days: on Thursday, July 17 around 9 o'clock the phone rang. "Yes, I'm coming right away." Sweating and shaking, but completely healthy, he grabbed his things and drove his bus to Munich. He remained there until Monday, but felt increasingly ill. Among other things he cancelled a planned drive on Saturday. On Monday he was supposed to drive Scientology members to the "Demonstration for Religious Freedom" in Frankfurt. While leaving Munich he braked too late at a light and caused an accident. Despite the fact that he was feeling poorly he drove a rental vehicle to Frankfurt. That evening, back in Munich Scientology center he vomited about 10 o'clock. The ambulance came and in the hospital Konrad Aigner immediately fell into a coma.

We would have notified a doctor much earlier. If Konrad would have been at home, he would not have had to die", believes Bernhard Aigner. In his investigation he was at first fended off by the Scientology center, "They lied about Konrad." Only when he drove to Munich himself was he able to find anything out. He was treated friendly and sympathetically during his visit - but no concrete information. Berhard Aigner said, "I went there angry and hateful, but they calmed me with nice words." Since December there's been no word - of the help for the family, as Scientology had asserted, no trace. The last contact was December 24: a card on which the sect wished "Happy Christmas."

"Nothing like this should happen again", Bernhard expressed himself. This is why he and his family are now going public, "We cannot bring Konrad back to life, but maybe he can serve as a warning to others."


The Puzzling Death of Konrad Aigner

Passau New Press
February 14, 1998
by Gerhard Huber

8,000 marks for a few circuits and a multi-meter scale. Berhard Aigner lays the device back in the well-worn hard-cover case: an e-meter counseling device, basic equipment for Scientology members who use it for measuring spiritual energy. "That is the only thing in our house that still reminds us of Konrad's time with the sect. And we'll throw that away sometime, too", says Bernhard Aigner.

Konrad was one of six brothers and sisters who grew up with Bernhard Aigner in a small Rottal farm house in Weiler Rumannsaigen. The parents were farmers and increased their holdings in the course of time. The family is intact - a happy group and a tightly-knit community. In their open house hospitality means everything. Konrad was mostly the center of attention. "He was the life of the party. Always joking and good-natured before anything else", recalls Bernhard.

After lineman training with the railroad in Simbach/Inn and the ensuing service with the military Konrad Aigner left Rottal in 1976. He went to Munich and to a position as a bus driver with the Federal Transportation Department. That is where he made his first contact with Scientology. Bernhard Aigner: "A naive, trusting, inexperienced farmer's son, who had no idea of what the world is like - the ideal member."

Konrad Aigner's positions with the Transportation Department as well as his places of residence changed: Munich, Augsburg, Ulm. What remained were the regular visits home to Ruhmannsaigen - and his membership in Scientology. Konrad did not make any secret out of that. Brothers, sisters, parents, the entire family knew about it. Nevertheless hardly anything was ever said. "That was off limits", said Bernhard. Only once, as a report about the sect was broadcast over the TV, did the deceased brother react uncustomarily vehemently and defended the Scientology view. "Otherwise there was never any sort of attempt by Konrad to interest and to recruit one of us in the organization."

Three years ago Konrad Aigner unexpectedly moved back to the house of his birth. In the meantime his father had died. Konrad threw away his secure civil service job and became independently employed with a used bus. "That way I can earn a lot of money, so I can move up the Bridge as soon as possible", he told his mother Anna, today 76 years old. The "Bridge" - that means "salvation" for Scientologists.

Mardi Gras associations, theater groups, sports fans - the easy-going bus driver was loved by the entire community. At home the facade crumbled. "In the last two years Konrad changed. He was tense, nervous, thoughtful", said Bernhard. The family often spoke about it and came to the conclusion that it must have had to do with the worries that come with self-employment.

Only after Konrad's death in August, 1997 was the personal catastrophe apparent. The first time his brothers and sisters entered his room. Books, pamphlets, letters - Scientology documents everywhere. Bernhard said, "We had no idea that he was in it so deep."

Georg Stoffel, public relations agent for the "Scientology Kirche Deutschland" [Scientology Church of Germany] did not want to address the specific case. But said, "We have no support from taxes and also no membership fees, we live from the voluntary donations of members - and that can be connected to expenses." Konrad's joy of donating leaves the Aigners a bitter legacy: their parents' estate is laden with debt. His brothers and sisters who commonly share the inheritance have to sell the land. "We have lost everything. We could only save our parents' house - but that is still worth something to us", said Bernhard. The Aigners do not blame their brother. "He went through hell and could no longer make his own decisions. Scientology ruined his life - and ours." All brothers and sisters agree unanimously, "If he would not have been with this sect, he could still be alive."

The bachelor left behind a financial ruin. Forms showed that he had within the last few months given about 70,000 marks over to the organization. It must have been over 600,000 marks, estimates Barnhard Aigner, in the course of the years. "Konrad made good money and was very frugal. He never bought a new car, never went on vacation and had no hobbies. In spite of that he left only debts."

Witnesses testify that Konrad had often tried to throw off the chains of the sect. He poured his heart out to a doctor, with whom he had been friends for a long time, "I want to get out, because I've changed for the negative. I have finally seen through the group." The doctor offered his help. Months later Konrad showed up at his place for the last time, "Everything's all right, things are moving again." About one year ago he tearfully said to his mother, "Mom, I want to get away from them. I have learned something so terrible that if I were to tell you, you would fall dead on the spot." But Konrad stayed with them until the end. And of course his mysterious death bothers his family, "We'll never rest until everything is cleared up." The district attorney is also occupied with the case. Konrad Aigner died in August 1997 after being delivered to a Swabian hospital and after a three-week coma: multiple organ collapse - heart, lungs and stomach had simultaneously shut down. Neither did the autopsy bring an explanation. "For his age the man had unusually poor organs", reported Chief District Attorney Helmut Meier-Staude.

Vitamin pills from the Netherlands were found among Konrad Aigner's possessions. It is suspected that Scientologists encouraged him to take them. For that reason a charge against the pharmaceutical and medical laws will be pursued. Charges which have been rejected by Scientology. Bernhard remains determined, "They have not directly murdered my brother. But indirectly they are responsible for his death." Konrad Aigner did not even have hospitalization insurance - he believed that his religion would protect him from illness. The brother described Konrad Aigner's last days: on Thursday, July 17 around 9 o'clock the phone rang. "Yes, I'm coming right away." Sweating and shaking, but completely healthy, he grabbed his things and drove his bus to Munich. He remained there until Monday, but felt increasingly ill. Among other things he cancelled a planned drive on Saturday. On Monday he was supposed to drive Scientology members to the "Demonstration for Religious Freedom" in Frankfurt. While leaving Munich he braked too late at a light and caused an accident. Despite the fact that he was feeling poorly he drove a rental vehicle to Frankfurt. That evening, back in Munich Scientology center he vomited about 10 o'clock. The ambulance came and in the hospital Konrad Aigner immediately fell into a coma.

"We would have notified a doctor much earlier. If Konrad would have been at home, he would not have had to die", believes Bernhard Aigner. In his investigation he was at first fended off by the Scientology center, "They lied about Konrad." Only when he drove to Munich himself was he able to find anything out. He was treated friendly and sympathetically during his visit - but no concrete information. Berhard Aigner said, "I went there angry and hateful, but they calmed me with nice words." Since December there's been no word - of the help for the family, as Scientology had asserted, no trace. The last contact was December 24: a card on which the sect wished "Happy Christmas."

"Nothing like this should happen again", Bernhard expressed himself. This is why he and his family are now going public, "We cannot bring Konrad back to life, but maybe he can serve as a warning to others."


Beckstein: "Scientology is a system of organized child exploitation"

Measures taken by the Bavarian state administration against Scientology
September 9, 1997

+++ Bavaria's Secretary of the Interior, Dr. Gunther Beckstein, characterized the Scientology Organization (SO) as a system of organized child exploitation. Ex-members reports testify that children have been subjected to degrading and arduous forced work. "The SO system aims for the destruction of natural parent-child relationships, with the risk of severe psychological damage to children. Beckstein criticizes the SO system, "the SO transgresses the human rights of parents and children with their robotic teachings of the creation of a cybernetically directed technocracy." +++

On the evening of September 18, 1997, in a talk in Augsburg, Interior Secretary Dr. Gunther Beckstein warned parents and students of being taken in by Scientology in education and in the fight against drugs. The Scientology system is only looking for more victims in this. The human friendliness shown in the advertisements is only a facade of pretense."

The true face of the SO teachings is shown, according to Beckstein, in the story of Tanya, the young ex-member. She had to perform forced labor with the Scientology elite unit, the Sea Org, along with other young people and also children. With total disregard for their human rights, children and youth were systematically ill-used, and their work was exploited by the system. Arduous physical work was demanded from youths and children from 8:30 in the morning to 10 at night, up to seven days a week. Further examples: night labor, digging ditches, cleaning sewage pipes, building walls, sorting out mail by the bagful up until 3 o'clock in the morning by 13 year olds; insufficient time for lunch; punishment for unpermitted trips to the bathroom during work.

"Parents that follow Hubbard's prescribed regimen for raising children according to 'Child Dianetics' endanger the development of their children," warned Beckstein. Among the brutal training methods recommended by Hubbard are the inquisition-like processes of questioning and the unkind training of toddlers. Staff members' time with their children are often restricted to a minimum. If need be, children who disturb their parents' work for the SO are declared to be "suppressive persons." That means that parents and child must separate.

As far as the SO campaign "Children say no to drugs," Beckstein stated, "SO presents itself as a fighter against drugs. It distributes leaflets and brochures against drug abuse. Following the USA model, meetings are announced in which children are publicly praised for leading a drug-free life. Actually, this campaign only serves for recruitment of victims into the power apparatus and money-making machine of Scientology. It is claimed in the increasing advertisements for Narconon that the drug problem is being alleviated. In reality, however, parents are being financially exploited and youth, as well as their parents, are introduced into an addictive relationship. Cases have been documented in which, people, after being exploited, have been left to backslide by the organization."


Tutor Trap:
How Scientology recruits the next generation

fm http://www.br-online.de/politik/ard-report/archiv/0906scien.htm

[From Munich, Germany]

June 9, 1997
by Lisa Wurscher and Marion Paulsen

Following up on an anonymous call, we come upon a pamphlet in Munich. A teacher there offers help for school and learning difficulties. According to our anonymous informant, the teacher is a member of the psycho-business of Scientology. We wish to follow up on the tip.

We pass ourselves off as mothers who have brought two children in need of remedial help. They have been enlightened as to Scientology. The time they spend here will cause them no harmful after-effects. We film the instruction with an amateur video camera. The textbooks originate from L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the organization. A pamphlet of the psycho-business lies on the table.

However the teacher does not explain anything to us about Scientology. The sole goal of the lesson is the definition of simple concepts. This kind of remedial assistance will certainly not bring about better grades. It has an entirely different purpose -- to introduce children to Scientology without, apparently, the knowledge of their parents.

We bought the same textbooks. We wanted to get to the root of the subtle methods of their influence. Then it became clear: the definitions of simple words lead up to a central concept -- the misunderstood word.

In order to remove the alleged misunderstanding, the children have to clear the word meaning. Example: the bank. A bank can be a row or a tier, or there can be money in a bank. So far, so good. Then the teacher implants his students with yet a third definition of bank -- the reactive mind -- Scientology synonym for subconscious. According to Scientologists it is something which should be removed because it encumbers the person. These definitions prepare the children for a hypnotic session, the so-called auditing. An agonizing procedure. We have yet to experience it for ourselves.

A half year later. In the meantime we have access to the innermost circle of the sect. We, ourselves, are to be trained as tutors for the Scientology organization, "Applied Scholastics."

We document the introductory speech in Cologne with a hidden camera. The director of the German "Applied Scholastics" center tells us, "Basically we are this office in Germany and we establish various study groups all around the country to become better known. And the bad thing at the moment is that we really are not able to become known, because the press immediately arrives and talks Scientology and brainwashing. And people close up. They don't want to hear anything about it or have anything to do with it. It's rather criminal, what's happening out there."

"Perhaps one would be better off not saying that to the people...?"

"I'll say that to no one. That is what is happening here, nobody gets anything at all out of it."

After this introduction our training begins. First, in Obertshausen near Frankfurt, we are supposed to be made into good Scientologists.

What we have planned is an experiment by one of the authors. Risky, because no one can protect themselves from the effects of the Scientology psycho-technology.

The agonizing procedure begins. We have to sit facing the so-called auditors with closed eyes. We may neither speak nor move. They look at us for an entire hour. With all our strength we struggle against the nausea which arises. Towards the end, the situation becomes almost unbearable. Silence as a means of torture.

After an hour, done at last. It continues without a break. The next exercise. This time we have to take over the roll of auditor. We are supposed to learn to apply this abrasive method later upon our students:

"Do birds fly?"
"Are you stupid"
"I repeat the auditing question. Do birds fly?"
"I'm also stupid. Do you know what my daughter said to me: you are a dingle-butt mom. That's what she said to me."
"Aha. I repeat the auditing question do birds fly?"
"Yes."
"Thank you. Do birds fly?"
"Mhm."
"Good. Do birds fly?"
"Of course."
"All right. Do birds fly?"
"Haven't you ever seen that birds fly? I think you must have seen that birds fly already. Of course they fly."
"Good. Do birds fly?"
"Mhm."
"Thank you. Do birds fly?"
"Yes, yes, they fly."
"Good. Do birds fly?"

That went on for three days. Sometimes we became indecisive and reacted mechanically. Our auditors immediately recognized that:

"Now I've got you. You've become numb. Now I have the button. You can't move. All right. Brain-washed. Is that it? Brain-washed. You've not noticed it. Right?

We presented this scene to Klaus Behnke, graduate psychologist and therapist for Stasi victims. ["Stasi" = former East German secret police, "Staatssicherheitsdienst" = State Secret Service.] His impression:

"A chill ran down my spine when I first saw that. It reminded me of something I've been told many times before, the psychic torture meted out by the State Secret Service, who used quite similar methods to, as the Stasi called it, disintegrate with their disintegration methods."

"Disintegration" works especially well with children. They have less resistance. This is why Scientologists press forward with the establishment of tutoring groups. There are already at least eleven "Applied Scholastics" franchises: in Verlbert by Wuppertal, in Erzhausen by Darmstadt, in Kriftel by Frankfurt, in Heilbronn, Hartheim by Freiburg, Hamburg, Berlin, Cologne and Munich. Scientologists disguised as tutors are on the look-out for unsuspecting victims all around the country.

We have to marathon-cram for the Scientology instruction method because it is time for the exam. We are not alone with our students. Beside us sits the director of the institute. She wants to monitor to see if we have developed into dependable teachers for the organization. Our research comes to an end with this course. After one and a half years we can finally end our stay with Scientology.


*Scientology - a Religion of the Twentieth Century?

In the Occident, ever since the era of Enlightenment, if not longer, the idea of "religion" has been understood to be an extensively positive concept.

The theologian, Friedrich Schleiermacher (1768-1834), shows this positive concept of religion in his "Reden ueber die Religion an die Gebildeten unter ihren Veraechtern," which appeared in 1799. For him, religion is the same as piety. "The combination of all such sundry expressions of piety, in that this differentiates itself from all other feeling, so that it itself is equal to the presence of piety," wrote Schleiermacher, "this that we ourselves are aware as absolutely dependent on, or, saying the same, as a relationship with God." [10]

Religion leads to right actions. A thought which appears in Lessing's "Nathan the Wise," which is also relevant today, is the so-called ring parable of the three religions (Judaism, Christianity and Islam in this case), which prove themselves through one form or another of piety.

Nevertheless, humanity has enough historical recollection of religions which have demanded and brought about human sacrifice, self-destruction and annihilation.

The sacrifice of all captives in ancient Assyria to the god, Assur, and the mass executions of Aztec prisoners in order to sacrifice their hearts to the gods call to mind the hideous crimes of the victors, and are cause for attempts of vindication.

Sacrifice of animals (such as are still carried out today by various cults, e.g., those of the goddess, Kali) and self-mutilation are not at all regarded as "occasional indiscretions," but have to be sometimes be understood as part of religious reality.

Whether Scientology is a religion should be the first order of business. In the sense of a positive concept of religion it is most assuredly not.

In any case, Scientology publicly presents itself as religion, even as "Religion of the 20th Century," as one of its pocketbooks is titled. [11] The general need of the positive concept of religion may have contributed to this particular presentation and description of itself.

Scientology never grows tired of building a foundation for its self-declaration of religion through books and brochures written especially for this purpose. [12] Scientology's presentation of itself as a religion does not necessarily mean that you have to think of it as a religion in the same sense as you do movements of which there is no doubt.

The idea of religion is barely definable. A religion does not necessarily require a belief in God. Otherwise, strict Buddhism (Hinayana method) would not be counted as a religion.

However, religion can quite certainly be linked to magic.

Ratschow once had called magic "life-bound religion which is not even recognized as religion in most cases." [13]

However, Ratschow pointed out characteristics in the same examination which differentiated between the dual conceptualities of "Magic and Religion" (the title of his study):

"The god of religion is a distant god. He is a fully unknown god. There always has to be a revelation before there is a discussion between people and the god of religion. (...) The godhead of magic does not need a bearer of divine revelation. Every person carries his revelations about with him. Each person faces a multi-faceted divinity. He finds him everywhere. He is close to him wherever he goes." [14]

In place of the priest is the medicine man, whom Ratschow characterizes as follows:

"The medicine man occupies prominent position(s). His status does not depend upon dealing between a distant god and people. He is a man whom experience has shown to be especially strong in knowing the execution of rituals." [15]

If one looks for the relationship of the presumed principles of Scientology, as described by its founder, to the god of religion, one sees the "divinity of magic." It requires no great stretch of the imagination to see the auditor as a medicine man.

It becomes more meaningful to understand Scientology as the magic of the twentieth century, rather than wear out the idea of religion with misunderstandings and restrictive preconceptions.

Magic played a part in the inception of Hubbard's ideas and methods.

After 1945, Lafayette Ronald Hubbard was rather heavily involved with the black magic of the "Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO)," the "Order of the Oriental Temple," which at this point in time was presided over worldwide by the English magician, Aleister Crowley (1875-1947), who called himself "The Great Beast 666" and who had announced "Do what you want shall be the entire extent of the law."

*Friedrich-W. Haack, Scientology - Magie des 20. Jahrhunderts, Claudius Verlag, 3rd edition, 1995, pages 11 & 12


Cosmetics training á la Scientology

Company boss has to answer in court for "malicious deception"

Gelting, Germany
December 14, 1995
Süddeutsche Zeitung Nr. 288

by Sabine Bader

Gelting - A company chief will have to answer to the Munich City Court on January 26, 1996 on charges of using her home for Scientology courses disguised as cosmetics training. The Beauty Colours International company held a communication seminar on "Color and Type Styles" in January of this year in which it used course documents based on the teachings of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard. The accused has been charged with "malicious deception."

"A sort of hypnosis"

Renate Baum had high expectations for the training. When the home economics expert from Neuss discovered the Beauty Colours International advertisement last year, she did not for a second imagine that a Scientology-managed corporation could be lurking behind it. She asked for informational documents on "Color and Type Styles" and signed a "license agreement" in which she obligated herself in advance for a total of 7,762.50 marks. In January 1995, Renate Baum then traveled to Gelting to participate in a 14-day seminar.

The course, which began as communication training in the company chief's basement, was a rude awakening for her. "Two people sat across from each other, and we had to stare at each other for hours, motionless, with eyes glued on our partners," she said. The exercise was repeated several times. The course participant recalls the supervisor's instructions, "Do it until all resistance has gone away."

For Renate Baum, resistance against this method did not go away. It increased even more in the following days. "It was a sort of hypnosis," she reports. "Objects seemed to suddenly start moving. I had a panic attack." Two other course participants had similar experiences. On the morning of the sixth day, all three faxed in their withdrawals from the training program and departed the area. They addressed the fax to the Wolfratshausen post office. "When we reached the train station, we saw the course supervisor at the boarding platform with the fax in her hand. We panicked and left for Munich from a different train stop." At the beginning of the communication seminar, the participants had received a checklist to verify their "learning successes." At first they paid no attention to the note on the last page of the checklist: "Copyright 1980, 1981 by L. Ron Hubbard."

Afterwards Renate Baum contacted an attorney, who ended up pressing charges for "malicious deception" against the company boss. To begin with, he wanted to get a refund of course fees. Then he wanted to have the company audited by the business oversight office. These were not the first legal proceedings the attorney had conducted against Scientologists, who operate worldwide. The attorney said that the name of the accused's company also appeared in the Scientology magazine "WISE EUROPE News." "The magazine gives an overview on corporations led by Scientologists and their active functionaries."

"Brainwashing in Practice"

Communication courses are typical of the Scientologists' "work." "In practice, it's an introduction into brainwashing where, among other things, the participants are familiarized with the Scientology jargon," explained the lawyer. He said he ran a comparison between the words used in the seminar documents and the "technical language for Dianetics and Scientology" issued by the Scientology publishing company. "The terms used in Gelting were an exact match." Basing its decision on the complaint having "sufficient prospect of success," in October 1995 the municipal court approved financial legal aid for the complainant, who is the sole source of income for her three children.

To the inquiry of this newspaper, the course supervisor said that Beauty Colours had since taken the communication seminar out of the program. He also disputed that the course had taken place in his home in Gelting.


Comments from Ilse Hruby

The owner of the studio about whom it is assumed the above article is written has not been listed on the Internet as a Scientologist since September, and she has also been removed from the "Patron" list. It is know that her husband is a Slatkin victim.

"Beauty Colours" appears quite often on the Internet, therefore it should be explicitly stated that this is basically not Scientology in nature.

There is an epilogue link to the above article of February 19, 1997:
http://www.innenministerium.bayern.de/presse/daten/scientology/8597.htm


from http://www.innenministerium.bayern.de/presse/daten/scientology/8597.htm

February 19, 1997

Regensburger: "Important decision by the Munich I State Court about protecting consumers from Scientology

Bavarian State Secretary Regensburger has described a Munich I State Court decision, which has just become legally effective, as important for the protection of consumers from Scientology. According to the court, the deliberate use, application and distribution of Scientology text as course material is a violation of implicit contractual obligations when this application has not been revealed by Scientologists. In this case the course fees were refunded.

Bavarian State Secretary Regensburger has described a Munich I State Court decision, which has just become legally effective, as important for the protection of consumers from Scientology. The subject of the legal hearing was a "license agreement" whereby the complainant acquired the right from the plaintiff to use and commercially employ "Beauty-Colours-System of Color, Type and Image Counseling" and its the associated products recommended by the plaintiff. The accused owner of the company failed to mention that this counseling would include, from its outset, a communication seminar from text written by L. Ron Hubbard, and that this training would be administered by a member of Scientology. The complainant had terminated the contract without notice and demanded refund of fees once these facts became evident. Munich I State Court supported the complainant to the maximum extent.

In its decision, the Munich I State Court found that "the use of text based on the intellectual works of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, and whose distributer, uncontested by the plaintiff, is the Scientologists' publishing corporation in Germany, as instructional material, and its use and administration by a member of Scientology presents a situation, the awareness of which is of decisive significance to the contracted person. Because if a contracted person is instructed by a member of Scientology with Scientology material, then that person needs to be able to decide, consciously and knowingly, if there is at least a danger of indoctrination present. In addition, there is the possibility that a portion of the course fees, as well as of the cost of instruction materials, may contribute to financially support for the Scientologists. Because of these reasons, informed consent is required from the contracted party." In a letter dated Jan. 27, 1997, the lawyer of the accused company owner withdrew appeal against the judgment, so the decision is legally in effect.


Konrad Aigner was terrified that his parents would find out he had mortgaged their property so he could give money to Scientology. Konrad's family found some papers when they cleaned up his room after he died....

First Knowledge Report
Second Knowledge Report

Glossary:
FPRD= False Purpose Rundown
DCI= Dianetics Clear Intensive earlier form of the
CCRD= Clear Certainty Rundowns
VGI´s= Very Good Indicators = :-)
BI">

s = :(

http://www.oursites.org/gabibrendel/
Hallo, my name is Gabi Brendel. ... I have lived in Munich for many years. I would like to help you understand Scientology better. ... I have found answers to the questions which have bothered me since I was a child. ...What happens to you when you die?

http://www.our-home.org/rosemariefreihoff/
Hallo, my name is Rosemarie Freihoff... I am 40 years old, mother of 3 children, independent and have been a Scientologist for 20 years. I have made Scientology into my career, that is, I help other people through the application of Scientology technology...

This is what Konrad's family found:

Knowledge Report

Dir I+R Munich [Direktor für Inspektionen Und Reports]
March 5, 90
cc: PC folder
Konrad Aigner

Gabi Brendel FSM

KR on Konrad Aigner

Konrad was offlines for 1 to 2 years and we (Rosi Freihoff and I) visited him in Neu Ulm. He wanted to continue to work for a couple more years and pay off his debts. He had done a few DCIs and had no purpose in auditing. We spoke about the CCRD and the Bridge in general. Shortly after that he came to Munich. He paid for auditing and went to the CCRD, then continued normally up the Bridge and had very big wins. The auditing changed him visibly. He wanted to continue to Clear and signed a Clear Contract with the Tech Sec. We worked out the options with him along with a package for about $24,000. We drove with him to his Bank in Augsburg, where he had put up a mortgage on real estate as collateral, where he already had a loan out for over $37,000. We wanted to find out if the collateral would cover this additional sum there. Rosi waited in the lobby. I went with Konrad to the loan officer. Konrad had already taken out one loan there for Scientology, but had said it was for renovation. Before we had gone into the bank, we had asked him if he knew

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what he was supposed to say and he said yes, he had already gotten a loan there. So he told the loan officer that he needed another $24,000. She asked what for, and he said for re-modelling. She didn't ask any more questions and said that she could give him $12,500 more because that was all the collateral would cover. The settlement would require several days. The loan officer said that she would have to telephone around a lot in order to find out the value of the real estate, since the property was in Lower Bavaria.

Since the amount was not enough and the bank wanted a larger mortgage for more money, we decided to drive to Lower Bavaria to 1. raise the mortgage and 2. ask the local banks how much they could give us for the property. Konrad had a bank connection there with Raiffeisen Bank, so we decided to ask them what they could do. The three of us drove down to Lower Bavaria. In the meantime we had to handle Konrad again, since he needed his parents' signature to raise the mortgage, which he could not confront. We went to the bank, I went inside with Konrad, and he introduced me as his friend. I had taken off my wedding band, so they could take me for Konrad's fiance. This

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idea had come to Konrad on his first visit to the bank, that it would be better for me to take the ring off, until then I didn't even know that I was wearing a ring, and I took it off in order to make the mockup believable. Konrad told the banker that he would be needing about $60,000 for renovation and re-financing and eventually a bus and minor investments, and that we had an appointment with the notary to raise the mortgage and get it registered. We had gotten the papers from the book of deed prior to that. They looked through the documents, telephoned the notary, the loan officer spoke with the management and they said Konrad could have the money, the $24,000, and they would take over the loan from the SpaDa Bank in Augsburg. Konrad said he intended on taking over the beverage stand run by his parents and renovating it, and creating a sideline to his civil service job by buying a bus. In the long term he also wanted to move back home, where a few renovations were necessary, such as installing a bathroom, etc. About noon we were done at the bank, at 3 p.m. was the appointment with the notary. At 1:30 Konrad had called up his parents and told them that he intended on moving home within the year, and that they had to go to the notary at 3 o'clock. He had to force himself to carry out the conversation. The plan and the idea

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were his. That which was not true about the story was that the lion's share of the money was going to be invested in Scientology.

So Konrad went to his father, Rosi and I waited for him in a bar. His parents showed up, co-signed the papers to raise the mortgage to $125,000, they made no trouble at all, and were happy that Konrad planned to move back in with them.

Then the papers from the notary went to the bank. The Raiffeisen Bank wanted to transfer the amount to Konrad's account at the SpaDa bank in Augsburg on Thursday. The GI was confirmed, Konrad had already given Babsy a check so that it could clear by Thursday. There were VGIs all around. It was a win for everybody. This whole thing had taken place on Friday.

On Saturday I went to the Org and Rosi was sitting together with Konrad Golling and was working something out with him. Rosi is Konrad Golling's FSM. After a while I figured out that the plan had something to do with Konrad Aigner, and I entered into the cycle.

Konrad Aigner now possessed a mortgage of over $125,000, half of which was encumbered. It would not be easy for him to get any more credit on his present income (the banker had already figured the upper limit to be $94,000).

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Rosi intended that Konrad G. talk with Konrad Aigner and ask him to let him use the $31,000 left of his available mortgage.

Konrad G. was in big financial difficulty. He was stopped on the Bridge, on the FPRD, with which he'd been having gigantic wins, and he couldn't keep up with his short-term loans. A mortgage of over $30,000 would have given him a favorable, long-term loan, which would put him in the position 1. to take the financial pressure off his lines, and 2. continue with the FPRD, and the Academy, which he had agreed to pay for. The plan was completely pro-survival. Konrad G. spoke with Konrad A. and K.A. immediately said yes. The only thing was that he wanted to wait until Thursday, until his check had cleared. That's what we should have done, but there were a couple of things which were not in favor of it.

1. We were playing the Birthday Game in order to get the Org up to St. Hill size and 2. Konrad G. had to go the USA for 3 months on contract, where he would earn a lot of money, that coming Sunday. There wouldn't be enough time to wait until Friday to go to the bank. So K.A. and K.G. made an appointment for early Monday to drive to Lower Bavaria to the Raiffeisen Bank

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to take out a loan for Konrad Golling secured by Konrad Aigner. The plan did not appeal to the bank. They warned Konrad Aigner as to the risks of standing surety on a loan and turned the application down on grounds that they were not permitted to operate inter-regionally. Konrad Golling had an account himself with a Raiffeisenbank in his home town, and he contacted them about this bank in order to get the matter handled. The banker there had just had an eye operation and would not be available before Wednesday because he temporarily had no sight. What next. The Org needed the income, the surety for the loan was there, the time until Konrad Golling went away was getting shorter. We had to handle it. So Rosi and I decided that Konrad Aigner should increase his loan by 50,000 marks and K.A. + K.G. should make a personal agreement that K.G. would make the payments for this portion of the loan. We talked the concept over with both of the individuals concerned. They said they were willing to do it. On the next morning we 4 wanted to drive together to Lower Bavaria to take care of the matter. However Konrad Aigner objected insistently that we should wait until his loan was approved,

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but we did not want to be put under a deadline by the other side. The one who insisted on this the most was Rosi. I didn't have a good feeling about this either, right from the start, but I didn't say anything about it since I did not want to be a stop on this cycle. So I pushed my objections aside and fought for a win. Rosi told Konrad Golling that he should still go over to Konrad Aigner's and stay the night, and go along with him to Munich the next morning so that we could drive together to the bank. Meanwhile it was Wednesday evening. Konrad Aigner let Konrad Golling stand the whole night outside his front door while he pretended not to be there. The Org urgently needed the GI and Babsi absolutely wanted Rosi to ride along. Rosi's plan had been that I would drive with both Konrads to the bank. Both my children were sick, lying in bed with fever and nausea when Rosi told me that we would have to drive down to Lower Bavaria early the next day. 11:30 at night I organized a baby sitter who would come to my house 8 a.m. the next day to stay with my children. I stayed up half the night giving touch assists and left the next morning for the meeting. Rosi and Konrad Golling were already there, and Konrad Aigner came soon afterwards. He was very bitter, he spit venom at us like an adder. We found out that he had intentionally not

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let Konrad Golling in, and that he had counter-intentions to the plan. Rosi put his head back on right for him. Konrad Golling and Konrad Aigner then worked out how the whole thing could be handled. Meanwhile the bank had gotten suspicious because we were in such a rush for the money and because they assumed that we were not being careful enough with Konrad Aigner's inheritance. This came out in bits and pieces. I had called up the bank a couple of times to see if everything was OK, then Konrad Golling showed up there along with Konrad Aigner etc. Our plan was now that we (Konrad Aigner and I) would dispel these objections in that we would say that I had heard of this surety plan and did not approve since the plan conflicted with renovating Konrad's parents' house, and that Konrad Aigner wanted to increase his loan up to 150,000 marks in order to get a 4 year fixed interest rate since that was the sum needed in advance, and the interest rates were going up again. The load officer, Mr. Wimmer, was not there, and his boss, Mr. Reich, thought all that was very reasonable, he agreed and prepared the modified documents and Konrad Aigner signed everything with no objection. We forgot to say that the amount should please be transferred to the Augsburg Bank, the same as we had done with the first amount. This did

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not occur to us until right after we had left the bank's lobby at 12 noon. Since it was lunch break and the door had been locked behind us, we ran to the telephone booth on the other side of the street to speak with the director of the loan department again, but nobody answered the telephone. Rosi called me in the Org and said that everything would be OK. We made our way back home. At 1:30 p.m., when the lunch break at the bank was over, we drove to a place which had a phone. Meanwhile Mr. Wimmer, the load officer, was back again, he had been out of the building that morning, and we were put through to him. Konrad Aigner told him that he should please transfer the money to Augsburg, and he said that would not do that, he would need invoices. Konrad was at a loss and gave up, so I took the receiver and spoke with Mr. Wimmer. He said that the entire sum was in a construction account, and it could only be used for purposes of renovation, and as soon as proof was presented, money transfers could be made through the bank. This was not part of the original agreement, at least not as far as the first 100,000 marks. I talked with Mr. Wimmer for a while with the intention that he would transfer the money to Augsburg as promised. He insisted upon the proof. I then told him that was quit alright. You receive the proof and you transfer the money.

-10-

What I meant to get across was that he should transfer the money now and then receive the proof as soon as it got here. He agreed to what I said and I left it at that. When we arrived back at the Org, Konrad Aigner gave us the checks which we would cash as soon as the money was transferred into the account. In principle everything looked fine.

Meanwhile the Org had cashed the original check for 38,000 marks at the Augsburg Bank, and the bank had called up for Konrad Aigner and wished to speak with him urgently. Konrad called them up and I found out that the check had bounced. He told them that the borrowed amount was to be taken over by another bank. The days went by and no money came to Augsburg. Konrad phoned up the bank in Lower Bavaria and found out that they had not yet paid out anything. On our first trip there we had said that a portion of the money had been for investment, now we had Konrad call down there to ask for a cash transfer of 17,000 marks for investment. They agreed to that and did it. Konrad Aigner gave me the check and we gave it to the FBO [Flag Banking Officer]. Now there was still 20,000 marks for Konrad Aigner's services and a total of 50,000 marks for service for and repayments by Konrad Golling in this bank and we didn't know to get it out of there. It had already been counted as GI, now we had to

-11-

get it taken care of, was our opinion. The pressure on the finance lines was very high. It took a week's worth of attention to get this problem solved.

Meanwhile Konrad Aigner was being audited again and had found something out which led him to believe again that he could be Clear and he was programmed back on the CCRD. Konrad found that reason enough not to pay the 20,000 marks he was short on his Clear package, since he would eventually not even need it. We told him things didn't work that way. As to Konrad Golling - who had since gone to America and did not know anything about the comings and goings-on here - K.A. said we should find another surety, another solution for him

However, Konrad Golling had already made out a standing order for the transfer of monthly payments, had made Konrad Aigner the beneficiary of his life insurance and and made a (mutual) agreement with Konrad Aigner, and, as has been said, is in America and does not know anything about what is going on.

--> * See next page.
On top of that, the banker (Mr. Wimmer) had gone to Konrad's parents and told them about the loan for 150,000 marks, and photographed the house in order to document its condition, and unsettled his parents as to the stated intentions of their son Konrad, and made a pact with his father

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that money would only be paid out if his father agreed to it.

--> * I had the idea that the banker should receive his bills so that he could transfer the money. Konrad had mentioned at the bank that he would need a delivery wagon / bus in order to haul beverages. So I saw to it / made a bill which showed that Konrad Aigner bought a small truck from Ralf Herold for a price of 20,000 marks. A couple of days later I backdated a return for this vehicle along with the appropriate credit slip. On mine/Rosi's request, Konrad sent this bill with the filled out transfer to the bank.

I drew up another bill, from Hartmut Freihoff to Konrad Aigner for remodelling, renovation etc of the beverage market and the farmhouse for a total of 50,000 marks. We didn't send this bill to the bank. We wanted to wait until we received the first 20,000 marks.

I told the parties concerned, Veronika Herold, Ralf Herold and Harmut Freihoff that this action was necessary to get the money out of the bank.

The borrowed money is flowing to Konrad Aigner and he should get it all back. The property belongs to Konrad Aigner, he inherited it from his parents, as long as they get lifetime residence rights. The farm is no longer worked as such, the land is leased. There is no reason

-13-

that Konrad Aigner should not have the money available.

His father did not agree to the money transfer for the truck, and the check bounced.

Meanwhile Konrad Aigner won't listen to anything about it, and does not want to take any responsibility.

Rosi Freihoff told him what the solution was, too. Konrad must go to his father and tell him that he needs this money for Scientology, and that he has posted surety for a friend for 50,000 marks and that he takes full responsibility for seeing that he will be paid back. This is something which Konrad does not want to confront. He is manifesting a PTS situation.

This is true.

Gabi Brendel

http://www.oursites.org/gabibrendel/index.htm


E File   Konrad Aigner
Chief EO   <---                                  5.3.90
Rosi Frehoff FSM

                                           cc. C/S
                                            u. Konrad Aigner

Knowledge-Report
re Konrad Aigner

Konrad Aigner has been in Scientology for 16 years + has not yet managed to go clear, that is, to go up the bridge, but is always falling off the bridge and has drunk alcohol, etc. As a result, we (Gabi Brendel + I) decided several weeks ago to help him get it together and finally get him up the bridge. Konrad Aigner owns some property (pasture land, forests +

field + a farmhouse) in Lower Bavaria, this belonged to him but his parents live there and have usage rights (or something similar) to these properties. Konrad had already borrowed 50,000,- DM / $31,000 several years ago + had paid it to Copenhagen. His parents had to co-sign (because of the usage rights) and Konrad was already lying to them then + he said he got the money "in case something needs doing around the house." Now we have the same problems, that if Konrad wants to borrow more money, he has to take it out on the properties,

because he has already borrowed 13,000 DM on his wage + life insurance + the 50,000 DM on the property. Konrad needed 37,000 to clear, so we went to his bank in Augsburg + asked whether we could borrow 37.000 more on the property. The bank in Augsburg only wanted to give 27,000 or 28,000 since they did not know how much the property in Lower Bavaria was worth + did not know how to find out. Konrad had the problem that he did not want his parents finding out anything about the matter. I told him

that we would go to them + that we would tell them that it was for SCN + that we would handle them. I told him that I would be there to help him. (I had already done that often enough), Konrad did not want that + was totally afraid that all hell would break loose with his family. Since the Augsburg Bank gave us difficulties on account of the money, I got the idea that we would go to a bank in Lower Bavaria which was close to his property + was familiar with it, then we would have a better chance. We then went to Raiffeisenbank in Triftern +

they had immediately declared themselves ready to lend 200,000 DM on the property, but in order to get it Konrad's parents had to have their signatures notarized. Konrad called up his parents + told them to go to the notary + said he would need the money "in order to do something around the house, etc." + they signed. He told the same story to the bank. He worked out a deal with the bank to borrow 100,000 DM then (37,000 for the Org, + 63,000 to pay off his loan in Augsburg) + the remaining 100,000 DM would be there if he

needed some more later. The bank in Triftern said that they would electronically transfer the 100,000 to Augsburg. So far, so good, that was the first cycle. Then I got the idea that Konrad Aigner, with the other 100,000, could vouch for Konrad Golling because he had to pay up + K. Aigner would not be needing the money for the moment. Golling then asked Aigner + Aigner agreed (that was 2 days after we had done the bank cycle with Aigner).

I had then sent Aigner and Golling together to the bank in Triftern so that we could wrap things up. The bank in Triftern said, however, that they would not give the money to Golling even if Aigner vouched for him because they could not work between regions and Golling did not live in Lower Bavaria, etc. We then went to Golling's own banks in Augsburg + in Stuttgart, but it would have also been incredibly complicated, because they were not familiar with nor did they know of the property + although that was so far away and

the Triftern Bank would even have to sign over the security etc. So we got the idea that Konrad Aigner himself would go to the bank in Triftern again and take out another 50,000 (for a total of 150,000 and then lend the extra 50,000 to Golling + Golling would make the payments on it etc. So we all went back to the bank in Triftern + everything went smoothly as planned until the banker made the statement "so as the invoices come in we will

transfer the money." At this point in time, the bank had not yet transferred the first 100,000 DM (from the first bank cycle) and suddenly he no longer intended to although he had agreed to it in advance. He must have gotten suspicious by the many comings and goings. It was probably also wrong to do this so soon after the Golling cycle but we needed the money now for Saint Hill size. Suddenly the banker was insisting that Aigner would

have to stick to the reasons for using the money which he had given (and that was house renovation) and would have to prove this with receipts. Gabi Brendel had talked with the bank on the telephone again (Gabi had been going into the bank with Aigner as his girlfriend) and then the banker started saying that would would transfer the money to Augsburg, the entire 150,000, but he had not yet done it, but first he said he would + because of that we

(that means Aigner) had made the checks out in the Org (the one for himself 37,000 + Gollings for 35,000). When the money had not gotten to Augsburg within a week, Gabi called up again + found out that the banker definitely would not transfer anything without invoices. We then thought about how we were going to get the money out of the bank because it was just lying around there + the checks were in the Org. First we had Aigner call up + say (to the banker from Triftern) that he needed 17,000 for furniture + that he could not get a receipt because he was buying it from a private individual

or got it from a close-out sale etc., then the banker transferred the 17,000 to Augsburg for him + the money is now in the Org. Then we got 2 invoices for Aigner 1 from Herold Transports for a small truck (20,000) and 1 from my husband for renovation work (50,000). I would like to add to that that the Herold fam. really owns this truck and that my husband really did renovations and that we wrote cancellations on both invoices as if the deal had fell through. We did it as cool

as could be, but when the first invoice (the one from Herold) went to the bank the banker said that he would not transfer the money since a little truck did not fit into the stated purpose of the loan and besides he had been to Aigner's parents + had taken pictures of the house and the parents had also said that the money could only be taken out for renovation and if he was taking it out for a car then the father would have to agree. So we had to let the thing with the invoice be

and the 2nd invoice (the one from my husband) was not even sent. Then I called up Ernst Haible, because I was at a total loss and I told him the whole story and he thought that we would have to somehow work our way back to the truth of the matter and iron things out or go to a new bank. We were to think up an acceptable truth + then go to Aigner + handle it. I then went to Aigner and told him that he should tell his parents + the banker

that he wanted to lend Golling 50,000 (that part is true) and that he had not wanted to say that before because the bank had already refused to give Goller the money when he wanted to vouch for him and he was only trying to take responsibility etc. (all this _is_ the truth). The banker recently told Aigner that things can be changed with the stated purpose of the loan. The banker is just suspicious + partly suppressive +

just wants to know the truth. But Aigner is scared of that, as far as I can see mainly because he would then have to also tell his parents and since he is scared stiff + and he can't confront that because he is PTS to his entire family + to the middle class in Lower Bavaria (like I said my opinion). In any case the cycle has to be handled because the checks bounced Aigner + Golling have taken services which are not fully paid for.

This is true !

Rosy Freihoff


Return


Measures of the Bavarian state government against Scientology

Disposition of the Munich State Attorney's Office I
115 Js 4298/84 of April 24, 1986

Munich, Germany
April 24, 1986
http://www.innenministerium.bayern.de/scientology/urteile/115js429.htm

In 1984 and 1985, the Scientology Organization filed charges of instigation and/or religious affront against critics. The Munich State Attorney's office collected these charges into a combined process and suspended them with a disposition of April 24, 1986. In doing that, the state attorney's office made the following key statements about the Scientology system:

"The Scientology Church is a giant, multi-national commercial enterprise (p. 13)."

For defense against internal and external opponents of the organization, Scientology .... also uses intelligence methods, operates in the border areas of illegality and, as the case dictates, does not balk at taking criminal action" p. 25).

"A bounty is paid of 400 U.S. dollars per head ... That sort of bounty is also paid for in Germany" (p. 28).

"A favorite sales technique is to tell the people who have taken the test that they are candidates for suicide" (p. 40).

"In doing this, criminal coercion and deprivation of liberty are also used" (p. 40).

The organization uses a different vocabulary for the public than it does internally ... a religious terminology ... which completely masks the commercial side of the organization, apparently created for state agencies and ... experts ... in order to obtain the protection of the constitutional guarantees for religious associations" (p. 50).

The personnel exploited by the organization have learned to escape the oppressive reality of the organization by ... producing an altered state of waking consciousness" (p. 63).

"Based on the evidence, there is a continued suspicion that the goal of the organization is the economic exploitation of customers who enter servitude to themselves then acquire more customers who are exploited." (p. 68).

"In any case, even a psychically robust sense of reality and critical ability are gradually deconstructed by these psychological techniques which increase suggestibility" (p. 63).

"Using the e-meter as a lie detector: an attack on human dignity" (p. 55).

Producing an abnormal waking state of consciousness - exteriorization - can lead to destabilization of the personality in the long term; in psychiatry it is regarded as psychopathological" (p. 59/62).

"The moral concepts of "good" and "evil" are equated to the medical terms "healthy" and "sick," so that behavioral deviations from the regulations of the organizations can be "punished" and "healed" arbitrarily" (p. 68).


Use their Blood

From: "Der Spiegel, Nr. 48, 1984"
approx. December 2, 1984

PSYCHO-SECTS

The Munich "Scientology Church" employs a detective to investigate the private lives of their "enemies"- among them county administration chief Gauweiler and a state attorney. The detective's cover was blown.

He drives his car, a moss green BMW 525i (license: M-DN 5461) like a world champion. In it he has a CB radio, a night scope, a thermos with tea and camera equipment which can take sharp pictures even in the dark.

He needs that when he climbs hotel balconies to get a snapshot through the window of the sizzling action. Karl Wunderer, 27, is a detective - specializing in "gathering evidence in civil, divorce and criminal procedures" (according to his card), a real live wire.

Of the 60 licensed private detectives that are snooping around in Munich, Karl Wunderer has been their most renowned representative for a good week. Granted, it was not a brilliant Sherlock Holmes caper that launched him into the spotlight, it was more like he was caught by surprise while he was on a secret assignment.

That was not embarrassing only for him. Also caught in the act was his client and attorneys: the "Scientology Church" of Munich and the well-known attorney's office of Wunderlich and Partner.

Scientology, recently categorized by Judge Sir John Latey of the High Court of London as "corrupt, sinister and dangerous," amounts to one of the most aggressive, money-hungry and most powerful multi-national corporations of the psycho-sects operating worldwide; in Munich the US group has had its back to the wall since May of this year.

Because of a number of suspicions - among them fraud, usury, tax evasion - the State Attorney's Office had the Munich sect central searched, and mountains of documents were confiscated (SPIEGEL 23/1984); last month the "Scientology Church Munich, e.V." was removed from the "Association register", thereby losing the desired, tax-exempt registered Association status.

The fight to bring the "church" from a "registered" [tax-exempt] association down to a simple "commercial operation" was led by the present county administration; its chief, Peter Gauweiler (CSU), has also fought with an iron will against dilapidated beer bars and vice establishments, and for full pitchers [as regards less foam in a pitcher of beer].

People who cause difficulties for the "church" quickly discover its bad side. In the Scientologists' eyes, these people amount to "enemies" and "suppressive people"; L. Ron Hubbard, according to an unknown, vanished (deceased?) founding father of the sect, has ordered special treatment for these type of creatures:

"We have never found critics of Scientology," he decreed, "who do not have a criminal past." Then, "Immediately begin to investigate the attacker for crimes or worse." And "Use their blood, their sex and their crimes to make headlines." Which direction to move: "The point on which they are most vulnerable is the loss of their work or their position."

The strategy of using informants, which is widely used in the USA, has only come to light in Germany for the first time now, since the uncovering of Scientology detective Wunderer. Wunderer was assigned to track down dirt on people, just as Hubbard dictated.

Select items from the investigation list of the "church" concerning arch-enemy Gauweiler: does he do business with pimps? Does he own real estate? What do his opponents know about him? Any connections or entanglements with homosexual or drug establishments? In the event that he goes to a strip bar: who with? "Find out everything that could be used against him in any way."

Another great Satan for Scientology is the Munich sect commissioner of the Evangelical Church, Reverend Friedrich-Wilhelm Haack. Instructions for Wunderer: Why does Haack not have a driver's license? (he does.) Why is he banned from the pulpit? (he is not.) Connections, plans, failures? Who are his enemies and who is his opinion leader? "Contact his children, wife and mother-in-law and get data."

Wunderer was also supposed to shadow attorneys and state officials who deal with the sect's public calamities: "Additional data from files - compare with that which we already have." The list of people to be tailed included the current Munich state attorney and the SPIEGEL journalist who did the reporting, ("Who does he contact? What else is there about him?")

Following his instructions, Wunderer sped around in his moss-green race car behind Gauweiler for 2,500 kilometers (fee: 1 mark/kilometer), observed his wife, researched his mother, positioned himself close to him in the soccer stadium (at 40 marks/hour), and snooped around Gauweiler's commercial business ("luxury villa").

Reverend Haack, who grew up in Thueringen [East Germany], was investigated for communist bloc contacts. Wunderer conducted investigations at the Stuttgart offices and in northern Munich, where Haack served as a religion teacher, and photographed him in a car accident in which Haack was a passenger. Spying costs: about 20,000 marks.

The Gauweiler investigation, within a four month period, came to a total of about 30,000 marks. The report, 2 1/2 inches thick with attachments, as well as the bills, were addressed by the detective to the Scientology attorneys Wunderlich and Partner, but both were delivered, he said, directly to the sect central. His checks for the order were paid from the bookkeeping department of the attorney's office.

Of course, the intermediary role brought the attorney's office under suspicion of being an accessory to the PI's operation; research which does not provide material for exoneration, but which pries into the private lives of competitors falls into the mine field of coercement. Attorney's offices such as the state attorney's office get suspicious about that.

Wunderlich and his partner, Deinlein, are worried about the reputation of their office. Last week the Scientology managers had them say before the court, in sworn testimony, that "all assignments" had been made by the "church," "and we were not informed about the subjects and contents of the observation."

The after-effect was that they terminated their relationship with the "Scientology Church" because of serious breach of trust and misuse of the office name. "We most strongly disapprove of that type of practice."

At the same time they were supposed to have profited from the work, according to the church. An assignment on the surveillance list was "other important data which could help us to clean up the situation with PR or with the help of Mr. Deinlein?" Deinlein, however, said he knew nothing about that.

The PR is already underway. In their mouthpiece, "Der Freiheitsspiegel" (200 000 copies), the Munich "church" fires off rounds from the arsenal provided them by the PI at set targets. An example: "Is Gauweiler's Million Dollar Villa a commercial straight jacket or not?" and "Peter Gauweiler - the Patron Saint of PI's and Pornographers."

"Der Freiheitsspiegel" arrived free in residential mail boxes at thousands of homes, including those inhabited by people who have something against Gauweiler. The result was a flood of gloomy material which Scientology could put in their black book. The goal is to have Mr. Gauweiler bow out

Rooting around in Gauweiler's private life was a type of Kamikaze mission for Detective Wunderer: Gauweiler, the county administrative chief, is also the oversight official for detectives. That appears to be how the detective's operation was exposed - a colleague blew the whistle on him.

The "church" believes that its downfall will come about if it does not follow the caring order of its "Commodore" L. Ron Hubbard (title bestowed upon self). By 1966 ("We use traditional espionage techniques") he had decreed, "Agencies may not be used (for spying)."

In principle, Scientology is supposed to use agents which it has trained itself. Since the beginning of the year a home-made, internal "operations paper" has been floating around the Munich center which is supposed to develop a skill for investigations - a school of the trade..

It describes the difference between "open" and "covert" data collections, recommends telephone campaigns, telephone interviews using false names, infiltration of anti-sect conferences, insertion of Scientology personnel in civil service position, getting to "enemies" such as Reverend Haack through his professional colleagues.

Alcoholics are excluded from this type of activity, disguise as a tramp is a trick of the trade - for the "dustbin collection" operations: trash cans belonging to targets are to be rifled under the appearance of somebody looking for food. This type of data collection falls under the heading of "secret."

For professional training, the "operations paper" recommends expert literature, such as "The Spy and His Master" (Intelligence service methods) by Christopher Felix, especially the chapter on "The Art of Camouflage." Two Sefton-Delmer books on disinformation ("Black Boomerang" and "Trail Sinister") are also on the class agenda, as well as "service lists" (intelligence directives - "a gold mine") and the SPIEGEL register.

Scientology operates over two dozen "churches" and "missions" in Germany (600 in 35 countries) - an empire that made founder L. Ron Hubbard a multi-millionaire. Scientology adherents work (or worked) in sensitive areas - state attorney's office (Cologne), federal criminal investigations office (Stuttgart), police (Hamburg), Culture Ministry (Munich), Science (Berlin), and quite intensely in the economy, especially in business consulting.

Teachers, doctors and lawyers are among Scientology's clientele, and, most of all, people involved in the arts - such as horror painter Gottfried Helnwein, the "Circus Roncalli" director Bernhard Paul, the singer, Julia Migenes - they openly follow their guru, Hubbard.

The detective has not made out well. He may have his license revoked and face a proceeding for accessory to attempt coercement. Wunderer will change his appearance and grow and beard.


A puzzling report is being circulated in newspapers: The Commission for Police Reform has accused Interpol of encouraging terrorists. The guardians of the law did not want to say who this commission was. They replied, "You have to do the work yourself if you want to find out who runs it."

Martin and the Detectives

The German Disciples of Lafayette Hubbard

by Helge Cramer

Munich, Germany
May 30, 1975
Deutsche Zeitung

"In this situation," wrote Friedrich Vogel, chairman of the work group on legal and internal politics of the CDU/CSU parliamentary faction, to Munich resident Martin Ostertag, "my faction is particularly thankful for your support of the basic position taken by involved citizens like your commission."

On the same day, when the spokesman for the Munich police force was asked about the letter's addressee, he refused to make any comment, "We are aware of this commission - but we have no reason to take a position towards it in any form."

The varying assessments were of the "Commission for Police Reform" with Munich man Martin Ostertag (26), who received coverage in the German newspapers for a short time after the Stockholm terrorist attack, only to disappear again from the public view without a trace.

"Commission for Police Reform criticizes Interpol," announced the "Frankfurter Allgemeine" newspaper on April 29 and commented that the commission, which started as a Munich citizens' initiative, had accused Interpol of encouraging terrorists. But who this commission really was could not be explained exactly, either by the German Press agency in Munich or by the Munich police president, "We do indeed know," replied the police after several fruitless inquiries had been made, "who is behind it, but if you absolutely have to know something about the commission, then you'll have to do the work yourself to find out who runs it."

Outside of this rebuff nothing further on the topic could be obtained from the usually more affable press agency, and nothing much else could be heard from the Bavarian Interior Ministry either, "That seems," a press spokesman recalled torpidly, "to be a one-man operation, nothing of significance."

But the commission is definitely not a one-man operation: behind it are a couple of dozen members of all professions, including the legal profession, but there is still something more which is not immediately apparent: connected to it in ideal and responsible for its founding are 20 million people - the members of the "Church of Scientology," which was founded in California in 1954 and which has existed in Munich since 1970.

"Silence from the government agencies," casually stated Martin Ostertag, who was later rounded up without [government] assistance, "is the typical reaction of established organizations to new groups they are not comfortable with - first they keep quiet, then they keep others quiet if possible." As the spokesman for the "Scientology Church Germany, Inc." and president of the "Commission for Police Reform," he takes care of press releases and sees to it that the association gets the feedback it requires; he does that so cleverly that, despite the deafening official silence, something always turns up. The lanky 6 foot 3 inch church spokesman hardly needs to worry about getting press material; ever since its founding the cult has constantly been annoying government officials and has always been at loggerheads with one agency or another.

In the Clinch with Psychiatrists

In the beginning it was the psychiatrists who quickly found something to object to in the practices of the cult. Twenty-five years ago, the former Navy officer Lafayette Ronald Hubbard (64) made an uninvited move into the territory of American traditional medicine with his homegrown "Modern Science of Mental Health", thereby provoking the wrath of the psychiatrists. He told his disciples that he did not have a new belief, but a "technique of self-awareness" that would show them the right way to "mental health."

As an artifact in his teachings of salvation, which he patched together from Far Eastern and Occidental bits of wisdom to give his novices the freedom of religion and basic beliefs distinguished by a higher being, reincarnation and a general struggle for good, he uses an E-meter, similar to a lie detector, with which the disciples have to confess to the learned masters in "auditing" sessions.

The medical professionals viewed this "technology of self-awareness" and this cult ritual which is sold to believers, one stage at a time, for an ever increasing amount of money until they reach "totally clear, as simple pseudo-therapeutic charlatanism, and they lodged their protests. The cult, which is growing rapidly despite its confused doctrine of beliefs ("Before the beginning was a cause, and the entire intention of the cause was the creation of an effect"), formed a "Commission for Citizens Rights," which is primarily dedicated to the fight against the "crimes of psychiatry."

The German Scientologist also joined the fight as soon as they set foot in Munich and had corralled their first hundred disciples. In "Freiheit," their private tabloid, they moved against the Max Planck Institute, which had criticized the practices of the Munich Scientology annex, to reveal that "the bloody crimes of psychiatry" did not stop in the Nazi regime. The magazine stated that the people in the successor organization to the Kaiser Wilhelm Society only regretted that they were no longer able "to simply order fresh and bloody children's brains," as used to be the case.

That - as in the parallel battle against psychiatry in the USA - set off the initial salvo of the church's war on many fronts. While the dispute with the psychiatrists was making its rounds in the courts, suddenly an 18-page file about the cult from the federal criminal investigation (BKA) office appeared - and then things really got started.

The BKA document, about whose contents all parties concerned maintain the strictest silence ("That is an ongoing process") leads one to believe that Scientology managers are being investigated for drug-smuggling, fraud, counterfeiting documents, bodily injury and other crimes, was not something the church bosses were going to stand for. They sued the BKA for false accusations and for releasing a police document to unauthorized parties. When the cult's investigations yielded that the information apparently came from the FBI and Scotland Yard, the church untiringly sued both those agencies at the same time; the value they put on the dispute was a couple of million dollars. While defendants every now and then show up and also the number of the courts blessed by the suits is continually growing both in and out of the country, the gavel has not yet fallen on a verdict.

For fighting Martin Ostertag on the Munich beachhead, all that is only a beginning. The blond doctor's son, who himself once wanted to be a doctor but then threw it all away to be happy in the church's bosom, quickly recognized the reason for the debacle - a lack of data security.

Therefore he founded the "Commission for Police Reform" last year which is supposed to protect citizens from "any form of police corruption" and get legislation enacted through reform so "that files from the police and other agencies are reviewed and handled with greater care." As its first work, the commission released a comprehensive data security report, which, clearly articulated, shows the possibilities of data misuse, and suggests a detailed legislative proposal at whose core is an obligation to communicate the contents and use of data to any interested citizen, as well as the right to records access and correction of false data.

Yet while unsuspecting state and federal representatives, whose ministries and agencies have received the report forwarded by Ostertag, paid their respects to the diligence and even expressed appreciation for his suggestions, more pessimistic officials reacted with silence. "We are aware," Munich's Interior Ministry let us know, "of the report; we have it on file, but do not intend to get more involved - it contains nothing new." The fact that Ostertag has dozens of letters of appreciation from members of parliament and from attorneys was met by the ministry with incredulity, "Yes, don't they know who they were writing to?"

Battle against Windmills?

The report's author does not let himself be put off by such deprecation. "Every new organization," he says, "which wants to fight for its values, gets no feedback at first - that is like with a new product that needs time to get accepted." Until it gets that far, the Scientologists are already sizing up their next opponent. And that now seems finally to be the Cyclops whose traces they have already seen before while they blazed through the thicket of evil on their path of life, but have only just now been able to correctly identify it - Interpol.

Their tracks were plain to see on any BKA document which the Max Planck Institute had used as ammunition against the cult - almost all their information, the Scientologists had determined, had gone through Interpol, and that made the agency suspect. Mainly because the peculiar association, in contrast to the FBI, Scotland Yard and the BKA and their leading heads, could not be easily sued. "Specifically," criticized Ostertag, "there is nobody in charge there and there is no court responsible for the organization - the only ones responsible were the police forces of the individual member states." For the sake of security the sect sued Interpol president Népote, although it had no chance of success.

The Scientologists soon made out another deficiency in the international police organization. The results of their investigation, very lengthy, similar to the data security report, came out in a "true history of Interpol." The list of deficiencies extended from - an already long known - misuse of the organization by the Nazi regime up to the self-originated accusation that Interpol was being misused the same way today, either by the new establishment of the old Nazis or later for political purposes by eastern bloc countries and other totalitarian member states.

These sort of revelations, spiced up with documents and reports from secret sources, naturally have so far had any effect only in America, where US Senator and Watergate investigator Monotoya has initiated an investigation into Interpol. Here at home, the criticism of Interpol, for the time being, goes no further than its inactivity on the Berlin and Stockholm terrorist files. But Martin Ostertag is hopeful that its true background will come to light here, too. "Every correct thought," he expresses the philosophy of his church, "will be realized in time, even if it is directed against established organizations. In the fight for better data security we are no longer alone. In the battle against Interpol we are still the first ones - but we will not remain alone forever."

In doing this, the Scientology Church, Ostertag assured us, has nothing against the FBI nor against the BKA nor against psychiatrists, with whom the long struggle began, nor against Interpol, which is probably the most recent opponent: all that is meant is the misunderstanding and the abuse with which such organizations use against peace-loving people like the members of the Scientology Church. "We are committing ourselves to the inalienable basic rights to free opinion and free practice of religion, to mental and physical freedom and to live as one sees fit for oneself. Anyone who steps on our toes along the way will get their fingers rapped."

Ostertag won't take it seriously when it is pointed out to him that the finger-rapping has turned into a free-for-all and that the cult increasingly sees itself surrounded by decreasingly tangible enemies. The church spokesman finds the concept of chasing windmills like Don Quixote or, more contemporary, Wilhelm Reich chasing UFOs, absurd. "Reich was alone, without adherents; we, on the other hand, are 20 million strong and we will persist. That's what the difference is, not in UFOs. But the methods Reich was up against, a person who fought and tried to find something and was subsequently ruined, that is symptomatic for what we are up against. We think that a false idea will, sooner or later, disappear of its own accord, without force."

His church's battle for belief, Ostertag is firmly convinced, will not disappear of its own accord. He is assured of this despite the diffuse teachings of salvation - the sick will be cured, the insane become normal and the capable more capable - he is assured by the constantly growing number of the faithful; this assures him of the first success of the Scientologists in the USA.

Fleeing to the open sea

However, cult founder Hubbard soon left his country as a preventive measure in order to establish the headquarters of his church near London; later on he withdrew with the command headquarters to a yacht on the open sea. Yet the "Church of Scientology," despite all the hostilities and the subversive FBI attacks, continued to gain more adherents, who at last were carrying out an investigation on secret FBI surveillance operations. What is more they forged ahead, according to their German spokesman, - naturally this could hardly be verified - and carried out a purge of psychiatric establishments, then they used their Interpol advertisements to motivate a full-fledged US Senator to commission a public investigation against the international police organization.

The Scientologists here at home have so far been denied that sort of success. All the government agencies, primarily the BKA, shy away from the theme of the "Scientology Church" and all related areas and they maintain a silence. "We've received a couple hundred inquiries on them," reported BKA spokesman Fuchs, "but because of court proceedings in process, to all inquiries about Mr. Ostertag or his church, the "commission" or their data security report, there is basically one answer that comes out of this building: we are saying nothing at all."


Telephone Terrorism and Scientology

"Apropos Telefonterror und Scientology"

From: "SPIEGEL" 1/1973, page 46
SECTS
"Munich 53 12 71"

The Scientology sect, which comes from the USA, tries to intimidate its critics in Munich by telephone terrorism, spying, and lawsuits.

The Munich radio journalist, Constanze Elsner, 23, did her research for four weeks. She wanted to know what the Scientology sect was doing in Munich. The sect, which is allergic to criticism, quickly suspected that her manuscript could contain disagreeable details.

At first they tried to prevent Elsner's broadcast from the "Bayerischen Rundfunk" by threatening to use "legal measures." When the radio producers did not react, things started happening to the Elsner at night.

Her telephone started ringing more and more after midnight. Unknown men's voices assured her that she would be "murdered tomorrow." The journalist had her telephone monitored by the police, who put a trace on the line. The success of the operation was reported by the "Westfalische Rundschau" last November, and they named the alleged Munich man responsible for the murder threats, "Hermann Brendel, 22, press speaker for the 'Scientology Church', and chief editor of the sect's department, 'Freiheit'."

Since Brendel had been in England for some time, the Scientologists apparently believed that the journalist was bluffing. Brendel's successor, Martin Ostertag, 23, wrote a denial for "all newspapers in Germany and all press releases."

The content of the press release: because Brendel could be proved to be in England during this time, it was claimed that the "alleged murder threats" were but one of the "infamous lies about our church", for which Constanze Elsner would have to "held responsible."

Brendel hat actually not made the calls, the newspaper people had made a mistake. The long distance office #4 in Munich had not noted down the caller, but the exchange and the toll charges (52 marks), which they sent to the journalist Elsner under the numbers OFe 74100: '...at your request the following call was placed: Calling number 53 12 71, Resident Hermann Brendel, Munich 2, Lindwurmstrasse 29".

And since Ostertag knew nothing of this exchange of mail, in "further information" he had unsuspectingly given the same address and the same telephone number: Lindwurmstrasse 29, Telephone 53 12 71." That number reaches somebody who answers, "Press Information Office, Scientology Church Germany."

And that is where the German Scientology sect had established their headquarters in a spacious office suite. At the time it was manned by a crew of about 60. Six weeks earlier, it had barely been three dozen "staff members."

The sect, which is hardly known outside of the Isar [river] town, has existed in Munich for almost three years, and already claims over 5,000 members - half of all Scientologists living in Germany. All are obligated to recruit new adherents. This is pursued as rabidly as is the prevention of those who wish to leave, so that the state attorney's office and trial courts are already busy with the Munich branch of the sect.

Ostertag reports proudly, in spite of this, that "Scientology is today the fastest growing religion in the world." However, when Scientologists explain what Scientology really is, then they always cloud the fact that their institution relieves innumerable gullible and unstable people of considerable sums of money through pseudo-religious and vulgar psychological tricks. From the view of psychologists, psychiatrists and pastors, the so-called "Scientology Church" is a strictly managed association of dangerous charlatans.

The American sect founder, Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, 62, is a washed-out science fiction author who made his first big breakthrough with his teachings of salvation which patch together universal philosophy and eastern religion. Since that time he has appointed himself boss and is riding about the sea on a luxury yacht. However, he is not idle. Honored by his followers (six million all over the world) as "our Ron," he is always devising more courses for them to take.

He calls Scientology, which he invented, "an applied religious philosophy which concerns itself with the practical study of knowledge. Through the application of its technology, desirable changes can be brought about in the conditions of life."

Compared to the multi-millionaire, the top managers of the sect are dirt poor. Although the subordinates must be satisfied with starvation wages, they are so fascinated with "our Ron" that they unscrupulously promise happiness and success in professional as well as private lives to everybody they train. They offer a large number of courses whose names are vastly different, but whose training drills are rather similar. The prices range from 160 marks to 10,000 and more.

Every course participant must first buy a so-called Hubbard E-meter for 717 marks. This is a device which measures electrical resistance. A person has himself "audited" while attached to this primitive lie detector. "Auditing" is what Scientologists call the confessions which are mandatory for all members.

Strict Scientologists hold onto this device almost daily, in any case, whenever they have to answer the mandatory lists of questions. These lists contain questions which would be of use to professional blackmailers. For example, "Are you a convict?", "Or have you committed a deed for which you could be prosecuted?", "Do you have debts?", "Do you take drugs?"

Only a few succeed at freeing themselves from the dependency of the Scientologists, says the Evangelical minister from Munich, Friedrich-Wilhelm Haack. In the course of his duties with his church, he is concerned with issues of belief, primarily with sects. Scientologists take up most of his work in this area.

It bothers Reverend Haack that the Scientologists call their association a "church" and ordain each other as "clergy." Haack states, "Churches have social programs. If Hubbard would show me his old folks homes, I would not open my mouth again."

Press spokesman Ostertag counters these type of accusations by hinting that every Scientology Church is "non-profit." His proof is, "our churches accept donations and contributions for the advancement of our beneficial social programs." However, the Scientologists have not provided accounts as to the amount of the donations, nor as to their application.

"About a dozen" former Scientologists or their relatives have already sought advice from Reverend Haack. They had wanted to know how they could get at least a portion of their money back which they had pre-paid for [Scientology] courses they did not attend or were not happy with. However, they have also asked how they could protect themselves from the persecution of the often fanatic sect members.

The clergyman has enraged the Scientologists so much with his counsel for apostates that the Scientologists, in one case, have accused him of pocketing refund money for himself.

The minister recommended an attorney for Hildegard Schelling, 21, a writer from Munich. She said that she had taken a basic Scientology course (160 marks) during her vacation in September "really just out of curiosity." After that she let herself be talked into another course for 1,500 marks, and then into being contracted for employment by the "org" (Scientology jargon).

The length of the contract (one billion years) was, of course, a surprise for her. However, she thought of it "as a joke" and worked on the street as a "body router." Her assignment was to steer customers into the headquarters for a "free test." On a good day she would divert over 20 passersby.

The weekly wage varied between 100 and 150 marks. That was how much she earned for being on her feet seven days a week, thirteen hours a day for the "org." After four weeks, she made a comparison with the writing job she had given up. That dampened her beginner's enthusiasm.

Harald Schmolt, who she got to know in the "org" and who was five years older than her, reinforced her in her push for freedom. He had joined "just out of silliness" and was often sentenced to unpaid work as restitution on account of "unethical conduct" (such as drinking beer during working hours). He finally succeeded in motivating his girlfriend "to cut out."

However, she could not rid herself of the Scientologists. Two of their functionaries rang the doorbell for hours until Hildegard Schelling finally opened up. She was brought to a sect hearing where she was interrogated for four hours by the "ethics officer" and by the "executive director."

Hildegard Schelling said, "I was supposed to be brought to the ship, "Athena," which belongs to the sect and which is docked in Copenhagen. They had already brought some people there who had practiced criticism."

Because of the "psychological terror" she was ready to jump out the window. She was able to get away only with cunning and the help of her friend.

The both of them pressed charges. The investigation is continuing in the state attorney's office.

Reverend Haack believes it "entirely credible" that Scientology harasses departed members. Several weeks ago he got a glimpse into a secret letter which is supposed to direct the Munich Scientologists as to the availability of the sect's own list of punishments.

The offenses, called "punishable conditions" on the list, are more disguised than clarified through the use of an apparently nonsensical vocabulary. For instance, "emergency," "danger," "non-existence" and "liability" are punishable. However, the descriptions of the punishment are clearly stated: a person who causes an "emergency" must perform two and a half hours "amends work" either in the headquarters or outside of normal working hours; "danger" violators have to work five hours.

Transgressions against "non-existence" unleash draconian sanctions: seven and a half hours amends work and, by the regulation, "minimal meal breaks, no conversation, no parties or group events." The delinquent may only wear simple work clothing "with black punishment stripes" in the headquarters; he receives neither vacation nor a day off.

When Reverend Haack discovered this piece of the Middle Ages in Munich and reported on it, the Scientologist went completely up in arms. Haack stated, "The had a private detective root around in my neighborhood. A supposed psychology student who called himself Jacobi brought me fake material about the sect. He tried to pass himself off as a Scientology opponent and wanted to sound me out. He was not particularly bright."

Scientology spokesman Ostertag had the clergyman notified by an attorney that he would like him to stick to his official duties and not "systematically" encourage Scientologists to ask for their contributions back. Ostertag, himself, wrote to the minister, "I would rather ask advice from a poisonous snake than you!" He also said that Haack was not the kind of man whom he would let his daughter marry (Ostertag has been of legal age for two years), and finally he accused the reverend of conducting a brisk trade in doctor's titles.

The result of this was that Haack charged Ostertag with slander.

Even more excessive than those against individual clergyman are the attacks of the Scientologists upon those in the medical practice, especially psychiatrists. In Munich, the sect had barely moved into its offices (the painters had not yet finished), when they went after the local psychiatrists. In their sect magazine, "Freiheit," they accused the scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Psychiatry of never having stopped the "bloody crimes of psychiatry" committed during the time of the Third Reich [Hitler's regime]. They stated that people's lives were still being shortened or endangered through experiments today.

When the magazine finally attributed "fresh brainless children's corpses" to the predecessors of the Max Planck Psychiatric Institute, the Max Planck Society (52 institutions) believed that climbing down into "this lower level of discussion" (adjuster Stefan Fuess) was inevitable.

They had the Scientology publishers served with a temporary restraining order because of slander and damage against the Max Planck Society. The fact that leading editor Brendel is now out of the country, explains successor Ostertag, is "sheer coincidence. That has nothing to do with the proceedings."

The next complaint is already at the front door of the Scientologists. The Medical Group and District Association of Munich wants to see the sect charged with progressive violations of the medical practice law (which permits approved doctors to practice medicine). Board Director Dr. Jurgen Bausch, pediatrician at the Schwabing Hospital, says he has "proof that the Scientologists are trying to perform therapy here in Munich."

The sect members are wrapped up in counter-arguments. They have always maintained that they leave healing up to the doctors and concern themselves only with "spiritual counseling." On the other hand, they like to announce that their exercises create health, such as those in the HQS course. It is not clear what HQS means, but the HQS effect is richly expressed. This course, according to the provider, could "noticeably help" "70 percent of all human illnesses." Among those mentioned are "allergies, heart ailments, weak eyesight and arthritis."

Doctors' association officer Bausch experienced something strange when he, as did Reverend Haack, started looking closer at the workings of the sect brothers. "I was being followed. They had assigned a young man to me who tried to pass himself off as a psychology student, and who wanted to find out what I knew about the association."

As he had been by Haack, the theologian, Scientology agent Jacobi was also discovered by the medical man.

In light of so many failures and legal proceedings, Scientology spokesman Ostertag sees himself and his sect members as victims of a worldwide conspiracy of press, psychiatrists and other opponents.

Most recently, he must also include the Frankfurt Superior State Court in this conspiracy. The court dismissed an application by the Munich "Scientology Church" which was supposed to have enjoined the Olympia Press, a Frankfurt publishers, from distributing a book ("Superhumans Among Us") by American ex- and anti-Scientologist, Robert Kaufman, in Germany.

"Anybody who supports a new religion," the 16th Civil Senate court lectured the Munich sect members, "has to count on being attacked by former believers. He must accept this, because, with propagation of ideas, he is now in an area in which strong dispute and battles of belief are usual."

Belief soldier Ostertag arms himself with hard bandages. No matter what Scientology is accused of or what is undertaken against it, Ostertag calls it "infamous lies" or "fascistoid practices."


Expensive Freedom

From: "Der Spiegel"
Nr 36/1972, approximately September 9, 1972

Sects

The Scientology sect, which comes from the USA, has started a branch in Munich. The medical schools accuse the sect of enriching itself through medical quackery.

In the Australian State of Victoria the sect is prohibited; it has been banned from several North American states. England has forbidden entry to foreign sect members. The reasons given were "unhealthy practices" and "social harm."

Now the sect occupies its newest beachhead in Munich. A sign in front of their 200 square meter office on Lindwurm Street points the way to "Scientology Church Germany" and "Hubbard Scientology Organization Munich."

Scientology is a word coined by US citizen Lafayette Ronald Hubbard, 61. For a good twenty years he has been producing and selling a conglomeration of "teachings of knowledge" to about six million Scientologists in eleven nations.

The sect calls itself "the largest organization in the world for spiritual healing," and has its headquarters in England, where it was moved after some dissension with the American authorities. Their yearly intake was last given two years ago at 15 million pounds (at that time 132 million marks [about $40 million]).

As it is in all other Scientology areas, Hubbard's slogan, "Scientology is the road to total freedom" is used to advertise in Munich. The three dozen Hubbard functionaries lure customers (over 5,000 citizens so far) with this and other sayings of the advanced teachings, such as "With Scientology the sick can be made well, the mentally ill can be normal, and the able can become more capable."

In any case, Hubbard been made hearty. He presents the fundamentals of his teachings in a book which contains promises for success in life as well as recondite mental meanderings. He puts them altogether in 58 axioms, of which Nr. 1 states, "Life is basically a static." Hubbard at first states what "a static" is by counting off what it does not possess: "no mass, no motion, no wavelength, no position in space or time." In spite of that, the static is said to be "capable of consideration, postulates and opinions."

More axioms state: "The highest goal in this universe in the creation of an effect" (10); "Indiscretion is the ignorance of consideration" (38); "Time is the primary cause of untruth" (43). Hubbard also enlightens the public as he did on the evening of May 9, 1963 at a half a minute after 10 o'clock when he stated that 43,891,832,611,177 years, 344 days, ten hours, 20 minutes and 40 seconds ago he had visited heaven.

Five years later, the English minister of the interior prohibited entry for the heaven visitor to Great Britain, and thereby to the Scientology world headquarters at the castle at Saint Hill Manor in Sussex, because the health minister had conducted a state investigation which found the Scientology cult to be "socially harmful."

As the authorities in the USA and Australian did before them, the British are accusing the Scientologists of:

  • rabidly persecuting their critics
  • inciting their adherents against family relatives critical os the sect, and
  • coercing confession under conditions similar to hypnosis.

Even after the proceedings were suspended at the end of 1971 because of a lack of proof, Hubbard remained on board his 3,300 ton yacht, the "Royal Scotsman." Since then the sect father has been sailing the seas, and business on land has been thriving splendidly.

Very few Scientologists know that "our Ron" had already retired as "director" in 1966. Since then the sect has been managed by a multi- member directorate. Hubbard is again selling his teachings whose captives have included not only managers and engineers, but have also "factually interested" a psycho-therapist from Munich, Dr. Joachim (as author "Achim") Seidl, 46. He said that in spite of all the criticism against it, Scientology somehow appealed to him. In his book which he is promoting**, Seidl delineates the Hubbardistic healing process as follows: "a finely managed teaching of salvation which is the first to combine an electro-psychometer, psychoanalysis, practical life philosophy and eastern religion into a global system."

-------------------------------------------
** "Beim Auditing mit dem Hubbard E-Meter".
Achim Seidl; "Im seelischen Underground"
Eigenverlag, München; 168 Seiten; 12.80 Mark
-------------------------------------------

This mixture is manifoldly and profitably plied in books and in courses, whose number are known by none. Just the Munich beginners are offered over fifty different training courses at prices between 180 and 5,700 marks with titles which are partly mysterious and partly attractive, such as "Life Repair," "Stabilization Rundown," and "ARS [sic] Straightwire."

In order to make their titles sound more attractive, the Scientologists have created their own hierarchy. At this time there are about 30 level. For each advancement a certificate is awarded and a Grade is lent.

Five main segments divide the medley of courses to "complete spiritual freedom" (Hubbard text), Grade 0 frees "from restrictions in communication," Grade I "from problems," Grade II "from the hostilities and suffering of life," Grade III "from the influence of past anger," and Grade IV "helps him to come out of his fixed condition and gives him the ability to be able to see and deal anew."

For many years the peak of Scientology efforts was reached when the disciples were called "clear." However, since there were more courses left over for them to take, the profit-making hierarchy was stocked up: for clears who want to become yet more clear.

The Scientology plebeians are recruited as "preclears," and must first buy a Hubbard E-meter for 717 marks. That is a box with about the same volume as a telephone book which has much wiring inside and gauges outside, and whose components cost around 150 marks.

The device is a variation of the Wheatstone bridge, which was invented over a hundred years ago to measure electrical resistance. For Scientologists, the e-meter serves as Hubbard's representative which controls the entire course of things. Hubbard attributes his success to constant confession with the e-meter, which action is called "auditing."

For this business, the preclear holds two tin cans in his hands, and these are fed with a half volt from the e-meter battery. The auditor sits facing him with long lists of questions. For each answer he receives, he notes down how the needle behaves on the scale. Every untruth, Hubbard has taught, can be read in the wagging needle.

Even though the needle may show the most imposing turns of scale when the preclear sweats or holds the cans tighter, the Scientologists blindly believe in their lie detector. The psychotherapist (and e-meter owner) Seidl confirms that the apparatus "not only objectively registers misemotions, but also all harmonic sensations of subjective origin with certain defective sources." Seidl calls the prescribed us of the "truth detector" "the most lucrative idea" of the religious founder. The written minutes of each auditing session are kept and offer, as Scientology opponents publicly assert, a constant means of pressure against the confessing person. Since the most intimate questions are asked in these sessions, the one being audited is in the control of the sect. The fear of blackmail has frightened many from leaving: blackmail of this sort has never been proven before a court.

Sect father Hubbard's craftiest apex is that after a few weeks any student can become an honorary (and unpaid) auditor for a (paying) preclear. Since almost all the somewhat spiritually unstable people jump at the chance to be able to exploit something like power over others, nearly all are controlled, and all pay for it.

At grand openings - such as now in Munich - the Scientologists also carry out promotion operations. At the Isar [river] they distribute an ARC Personality Test on a leaflet. That consists of 200 questions such as "do you often smile?" or "are you friendly in mood, conversation and conduct?"

Those who fill out the forms are promised that after a free, technical evaluation of the questionnaire by the Scientologists, they will learn of decisive points about themselves.

Three young Munich residents, who wanted to test the test for themselves, divided up the answer among themselves. One answered correctly, one always picked the opposite of the first, and the third picked answers at random. After the evaluation of their results, it was revealed to all three that they were really "disguised murderers." The actual crime itself could only be prevented if the potential assassins would sign up for a Communications course for 180 marks.

Friedrich-Wilhelm Haack, the Evangelical minister and sect expert from Munich who has already heard complaints from several Munich residents about their suffering at the hands of Scientology, believes the sect's activities are "charlatanism camouflaged as religious freedom."

Therapist Seidl does not rule out the possibility that the religious fanatics are not only fleecing their customers but could be causing them hygienic harm. He states, "The danger exists, for example, that a schizophrenia not recognizable by the lay person could arise which would never have otherwise come into play." He further states that Hubbard's sect is "also doubtlessly authoritarian, reactionary, and irrational," however "you cannot simply dismiss Scientology as simple pickpocketing. The matter is more dangerous than that."

The school of medicine, in unison with the graduate psychologist and author of the book, "Family and Aggression," David Mantell, 30, have accused the sect members in the Munich newspaper "Abendzeitung", that they are using therapy without any psychological or psychotherapeutical education. Mantell, at this time, is employed with the research center for psychotherapy and psychopathology in the Max Planck association in Munich.

However, the Munich Scientologists were already prepared for accusations of Mantell's caliber. For years the sect has been fighting with psychiatrists all over the world. The counter argument was supplied by Hubbard's headquarters in England.

The Munich Scientologists - with unlimited financial resources from their Church - have published a magazine by the name of "Freiheit" [Freedom], which is supposed to be appearing monthly in Munich effective immediately. The August "Freiheit" even asserts that the "bloody crimes of psychiatry" had not at all stopped with the fall of the Third Reich [Nazis]. Hermann Brendel, 22, who was ordained a "clergyman" in the Munich district three months ago, even blustered that the successors of the the Nazi doctors were only sorry "that they could no longer order fresh and bloody children's brains as easily as they did with the Nazis."

Munich's chief Scientologist presumes a stacked deck in criticism of the sect. He states "That is a conspiracy by psychiatrists against us. We had hardly founded a 'Commission for Violations of Psychiatry against Human Rights' when these insane institutional psychiatrists let loose."